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Anonymous
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track city said 1 week ago

How To Make Track More Popular

Why isn't this a thing at all track meets? Seems like common sense

http://thefasttrack.org/home/2017/7/16/how-to-fix-the-tracktown-summer-series

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    track sucks said 1 week ago

    It's a good idea, but thats about all. Who's going to make the effort to make this system a reality in either the US or Canada? Article said it as well - nobody cares enough about pro track in North America to make a change like this

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  • obvious User since:
    Apr 1st, 2007
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    Obvious said 1 week ago

    Quoting: track city
    "Why isn't this a thing at all track meets? Seems like common sense

    http://thefasttrack.org/home/2017/7/16/how-to-fix-the-tracktown-summer-series"


    "Imagine a system where the meet revenue from spectators is pooled together as a prize for competitors. Every fan that pays for meet entry, concessions, or merchandise would basically be giving a portion of their money to the meet prize pool."

    The common sense answer is that very few meets are not subsidized with the result that there isn't a pool of meet revenue available to be handed out as prize money.

    Most meets with recognizable names competing are also spending a fair bit on travel/accommodations just to get those athletes in town and on the starting line.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 week ago

    Quoting: track city
    "Why isn't this a thing at all track meets? Seems like common sense

    http://thefasttrack.org/home/2017/7/16/how-to-fix-the-tracktown-summer-series"


    I watched this on ESPN yes you heard it right ESPN not ESPN2 or on somewhere where you need to pay a monthly fee.

    It was amazing, the events were bang, bang right after one another. The races were exciting, the stadium announcers were engaged and fans were allowed right down against the track.

    I just endured 2 1/2 days at the BC Track Championships it was the most boring affair ever. 3 to 5 minutes between heats and events was excrutiating and boring.

    Want to make track more exciting? Pick up the pace between events would be the first step. As a parent I find it boring you will never attract non-parent fans under the current snail pace way we run meets.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 1 week ago

    I find this analysis re. the TrackTown series from The Fast Track interesting – but with “hits” and “misses" as regards the points made. Some of my “rationale” in not completely endorsing the “solution” offered in the article is anecdotal, but some is based on history, as well as current trends and market analysis.

    Hit

    “TrackTown does deserve some credit, however. Nobody else is signing up to gather sponsors or attempting to make track a professional sport, so we'll give them that much.”

    Correct: any initiative these days is better than no initiative regarding the popularity of T&F/Athletics. Is a bad implementation potentially damaging one may ask? The answer is a definite “no”, as the sport is barely registering a blip on the radar these days. Even the attendance at one of the world’s top meets – the US Olympic Trials – was sparse recently.

    Semi-Hit

    “This could also help level the prizes for athletes in less prominent events. Typically sprints and mid-distance events draw larger crowds than jumps and throws, but this system changes that as well. If the winner of the women's shot put throws a WR, they would almost certainly get the top performance of the meet and therefore the largest share of the meet's prize pool. How exciting would it be to have a thrower and a jumper take turns out-doing each other for a chance to win the largest share of the prize pool?”

    Good point – the sport is called Track and Field, and historically (see the Ancient Olympics) the sport has included events other than those involving running. An effective presentation and promotion of these events would seem to be essential to the preservation of the sport in its original form and spirt. One may argue that excising these events would be better for the sport’s viability, but my contention is that the Field portion of the sport (especially the weight events) has been marketed poorly over the years.

    Misses

    “Our first suggestion: end the team format and never look back. Track is an individual sport, don't try to make it something it isn't.”

    Looking at T&F/Athletics history, when the sport was at its popular peak (granted, the competitive space was far less crowded during these times), a team aspect was core to its appeal. As an example, the national dual, triangular, etc. meets held in the Cold War era were immensely popular. The LA Coliseum was the site of some of these clashes between the US and Russia (held between 1958 and 1985), and the cavernous arena was well populated. Wikipedia notes that:

    “The most classic meeting is considered the 1962 competition in Stanford, California, with an attendance of more than 150,000 on a two-day event, the largest ever on a non-Olympic track and field competition. Even the Soviet workouts attracted crowds of 5,000.”

    And if one needs more proof of the power of nationalism, one needs to look beyond the quadrennial moment-in-the-sun that the sport enjoys every Olympic Games. Why do people en masse watch at these times (as opposed to the between-the-Olympics periods)? Because most of the world’s peoples are proud of their home country, and the teams that represent them internationally.

    The same dynamic holds true in interscholastic completion, where track has far less trouble attracting interest. As in the Olympics, there is an identification on the part of the spectator/fan. There is an affinity with the athlete(s) as they are not only competing in their own interests, but also on the part of the institution, and its constituents.

    “Our proposal is to combine golf's tiered prize pool system with the IAAF scoring tables to award athletes a portion of the meet's prize pool. This would put all athletes regardless of event or gender on an even playing field. The IAAF created a scoring table to more accurately compare performances across events and genders. The top performance (based on IAAF scoring tables) would earn more of the prize pool than the second best performance. The second best performance would earn more than the third best and so on. This would level the playing field among track athletes and allow for a golf-inspired payout structure. Track could also accommodate a 70-athlete payout system just like golf given the large number of athletes that are required for a full track meet.”

    Yes, it is true that sports like golf and tennis, while not team-based (apart from the Ryder and Davis Cup events), use titles and prize-money targets as a way of creating drama and fashioning a compelling spectator product. But once again, it must be reasoned that this dynamic is intimately tied to the origin of the competitor (see nationalism and team-based identification on the part of the spectator).

    • “Imagine what this would do to the motives of every athlete at the meet. When a runner falls off the pack of a 5000m race, they would be forced to push all the way to the finish instead of calling it a day with 3 laps to go. All of the sudden, athletes are competing not only against their direct competitors but also the athletes in other events throughout the meet.”

    As referred to in the previous point, while fiscal gain/loss can be used to generate conflict and drama as a means to a good consumable product, the idea that a 5000m runner well back in their race is in a compelling battle with a SP competitor for a small payday is rather thin. Even if the announcers and/or broadcasters/presenters indeed pick up on this, it is a real stretch to believe that the spectators/watchers will be held in rapt attention to such nebulous and low stakes.

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    Andrew Jones said 1 week ago

    Even the attendance at one of the world’s top meets – the US Olympic Trials – was sparse recently.

    Correction: at the recent USATF national meet at Sacramento to help select the US 2017 WC team.

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  • new-post-last-visitanonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 11 hours ago

    1. No one wants to sit in the broiling sun for hours therefore make sure your event is in a stadium with shade

    2. Speed up the time between events. Anything more than 2 minutes is too long.

    3. Good announcers

    4. Make it a festival environment....food trucks, beer garden

    5. Limit the meet to 3 hours.

    6. You don't need to offer every event at your meet. (ie. 100m or 200m not both, 1500 or 3000 not both). It's a great way to get athletes to run distances other than their favorites AND spectators like larger fields.

    7. Eliminate the 5000m and 10000m from meets....boring to watch an event with so many laps and a field spread out that you can't tell who is leading.

    8. Everyone loves relays including athletes. Add a few relays.

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