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Atlantic U23 - 2019 in Review

Posted 2 weeks ago

2019 in Review

2019 has shaped up to be an impressive year for the sport of athletics in Atlantic Canada! From personal bests, rankings, records, medals, and national teams, Atlantic athletes have continued to make their mark on the national stage, and to represent our region in a sport that is constantly evolving in competitiveness. To cap off another wonderful year for our region, AtlanticU23 is very pleased to present our 2nd annual year in review, and to announce those twenty-three athletes who have been selected to receive an Outstanding Performer Award for the 2019 year.

 

Outstanding Performer Award Recipients

Athletes under the age of twenty-three years and registered members of an Atlantic provincial branch of Athletics Canada were chosen based upon their cumulative performances throughout the calendar year, including performances achieved throughout indoor and outdoor track and field, cross country, and road racing.

In addition to our write-up of their major accomplishments this year, we asked each athlete to tell us a lesson that they have learned from their participation in athletics that applies specifically to their life away from sports.

 

Mya Archibald (Fall River, Nova Scotia)
Out-jumping her competitors when the task seemed insurmountable, the story of Fall River’s Mya Archibald winning a national title could be made into a box office hit. Competing in the U16 category at the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships, Mya achieved a breathtaking comeback to claim gold in the high jump. Clearing the starting heights with ease, Mya quickly experienced trouble at 1.55m, missing her first two attempts – had she failed to clear this height, she would have placed 6th. Mya cleared on her third attempt, but faced an identical challenge at 1.58m – had she failed to clear this height, she would have placed 3rd, but lost the bronze medal on countback. Clearing 1.58m, Mya was guaranteed silver, but would need to out-jump her competitor to have a shot at the national title. Mya cleared 1.61m on her final attempt, jumping higher than she ever had before and winning the gold medal. Mya also placed 13th in the long jump.

Lesson: Sport has taught me so much, but one of the big things is that hard work does indeed pay off. So much of the work that we put into training isn’t seen. All people see are the few minutes on the track. Which is a lot like my school work – you see the final grade on the test but not the hours of studying. Also sport has taught me how to respond to failure. It’s taught me that sometimes you win and sometimes you lose and that’s okay, life goes on. Hold your head high because there will be another day to compete.

Alexander Amero (Valley, Nova Scotia)
Throwing his best when it mattered most, Valley’s Alexander Amero has quickly begun to make a name for himself in the javelin throw. Competing in the U20 category at the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Alex improved upon his 9th place ranking in the javelin throw, achieving a nearly five metre personal best of 56.43m to place 5th. Alex also placed 8th in the discus throw.

Lesson: Over the past years of competing in track and field I’ve learned many positive lessons that have helped me along the way, and will help me in the future. My coaches have helped me realize my own potential by helping me set and accomplish goals. In track and field I’ve met amazing people that helped me connect with others across the province and build relationships for life.

Jack Berkshire (Fredericton, New Brunswick)
Stepping up to the long sprint during the indoor season, Fredericton’s Jack Berkshire instantly became a medal contender. Naturally a 300m/400m specialist, Jack added the 600m to his repertoire this year – recording a blistering time of 1:18.17, he quickly became a national leader. Representing the University of Toronto at the OUA Track and Field Championships, Jack captured silver in the 600m, placed 4th in the 300m, and 4th as a member of the university’s 4x400m team. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Jack captured bronze in the 600m, placed 7th in the 300m, 5th as a member of the university’s 4x200m team, and captured bronze as a member of the university’s 4x400m team. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Jack placed 6th in the 400m.

Lesson: Confidence. Believing in yourself is half the battle a lot of the time in athletics. Similarly, in work or school believing your results are accurate or the method you are using to complete a task is correct is necessary to gain buy-in from colleagues.

Noah Berniquer (North River, Nova Scotia)
By setting aside his passion for jumping and focusing on his talent as a thrower, North River’s Noah Berniquer saw the fruits of his labour. Despite being the top ranked U18 athlete in the long jump, triple jump, and javelin throw in his home province this year, Noah elected to only contest the javelin throw at the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships. The move paid off as Noah threw a massive personal best of 58.42m at the Championships, claiming the silver medal in what turned out to be a more competitive event than was originally anticipated – twelve of the sixteen competitors achieved personal best throws.

Lesson: Something that I have learned through athletics that applies to my life outside of sports is that defeat is a choice. If you have a bad game, bad meet, or even a bad play, you get frustrated, sure. But it’s all about picking yourself up and making every effort to be a better you next time. Nobody’s life is going to be perfect, and striving harder for a greater result is the difference between being victorious and being defeated. If you constantly try harder in whatever you may do no matter the outcome is, it is considered winning. It’s all up to you whether you want to give up or give it all you’ve got and no matter what the outcome is, believing you gave it all you could is considered a win.

Siona Chisholm (Antigonish, Nova Scotia)
Still in the bottom-end of the U18 age category, Antigonish’s Siona Chisholm has already proven herself a rising star in the endurance events. At the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships, Siona had the race of her life in the 3000m, achieving a sixteen second personal best and breaking ten minutes for the first time in her career – Siona placed 4th and missed the podium by just a quarter-of-a-second. Siona also placed 11th in the 1500m and 10th as a member of the province’s 4x100m team.

Lesson: A lesson I would like to share from my participation in athletics, specifically track and cross country, is self-discipline. Training involves workout practices and long runs often scheduled by yourself, especially in months away from the NSSAF cross country and track calendar. So I have developed a lot of discipline and motivation to make sure I am committing to my training, so I am capable of achieving my set goals in the sport. As well, this self-discipline I develop is a quality that helps me obtain my goals I set as a student in my academics and other areas of my life. I hope this quality continues to grow, as well as a variety of others I gained from my participation in athletics, to help me grow as an athlete, student, and more.

Peter Collier (Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia)
Recording impressive marks in the runs, jumps, and throws, Lower Sackville’s Peter Collier is not only a polished athlete in the combined events, but also a contender in the individual sprint events. Representing the University of Toronto at the OUA Track and Field Championships, Peter captured gold in the heptathlon and placed 7th in the 60m. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Peter captured silver in the heptathlon, placed 9th in the long jump, and 12th in the 60m. Peter’s times of 6.96 and 6.91 in the 60m at the OUA Championships and U SPORTS Championships, respectively, set new meet records and marked the first time that any Canadian university athlete broke 7 seconds at these championships within the multi-event. In his brief outdoor season, Peter recorded sub-11 second and sub-22 second times in the 100m and 200m, respectively.

Lesson: Participating in athletics has taught me a lot about accountability and focus. Being an individual sport, you learn very quickly that the work you put in correlates directly with the end result. Off the track, the same principle applies to nearly every aspect of life, hard work yields results. I also learned how to focus in on the smaller, more achievable goals on the path to an end result. As well as how to emphasize little victories along the way. Even when things don't seem to go as I want, there's always a positive takeaway from every experience. Without my time on track, I would not have developed these useful life skills that help me promote success in all aspects.

Keighan DeCoff (Frasers Mountain, Nova Scotia)
While an athlete’s progression from the U16 age category to the U18 category frequently poses a significant challenge, Frasers Mountain’s Keighan DeCoff demonstrated that she is an exception to this statistic. At the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships, Keighan threw a personal best in the discus throw to capture the bronze medal. The following day, Keighan threw a one-and-a-half metre personal best and secured the gold medal by just 1 centimetre. Keighan’s throw of 14.96m in the shot put was the farthest by a female U18 athlete in Canada this year.

Lesson: Experience takes time, you can’t learn everything overnight. So don’t get discouraged if something doesn’t work out right away, if you discipline yourself and keep working hard everything will come together in the end.

Laura Dickinson (South Nelson, New Brunswick)
Over-tripling her usual race distance and removing the barriers, South Nelson’s Laura Dickinson demonstrated that her talents extend to the farthest distances in track and field. Representing Syracuse University at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field East Preliminary Round, Laura placed 6th in the 10000m and went on to place 15th at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships. Representing Canada at the Summer Universiade, Laura improved upon her 10th place ranking and placed 5th in a tactical 10000m race that saw temperatures exceed 30°.

Lesson: Running has developed my confidence to pursue my passions, both inside and outside of athletics.

Josh Hamilton (St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador)
Cementing his status as an emerging sprinter, St. John’s Josh Hamilton has found great success at his new home in Guelph, Ontario. Representing the University of Guelph at the Spire NCAA D1 Invitational, Josh teamed-up with fellow Gryphons and Ontario athletes Graeme Thompson, Daniel Harper, and Philip Osei to produce a winning time of 3:07.43 – the time eclipsed a longstanding Canadian record, but could not be ratified due to the track’s oversize distance. At the OUA Track and Field Championships, Josh placed 7th in the 300m and captured gold as a member of the university’s 4x400m team, which broke the meet record with a time of 3:15.87. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Josh and his teammates continued their dominance, capturing gold in the 4x400m with a new meet record of 3:11.67. Competing in the U20 category at the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Josh produced the fastest time in the preliminaries of the 400m, but was unable to advance to the finals due to his non-citizenship status. Josh’s times of 34.45 in the indoor 300m and 52.40 in the 400mh were the fastest times by a male U20 athlete in Canada this year.

Lesson: The biggest thing I’ve learned from athletics so far is the power that your mind has. In my opinion we need to learn how to build our mental toughness to ensure it stays strong through diversity. This is important not only in sport but in our everyday because we face diversity in every aspect of our lives and unless we learn to adapt and overcome, the path to success will never be clear.

Jordan Henri (Moncton, New Brunswick)
Already one of the fastest men in Atlantic history, Moncton’s Jordan Henri climbed the rankings and emerged victorious this year. Competing in the U20 category at the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Jordan captured gold in the 100m and placed 20th in the 200m. In the 100m, Jordan dipped under the 11 second barrier for the first time this year, and recorded sub-11 times in four of his five wind-legal runs. Representing the University of Guelph in his first meet of this indoor season, Jordan has already twice broken the 7 second barrier in the 60m. Jordan’s indoor time of 22.10 in the 200m was the fastest time by a male U20 athlete in Canada this year.

Lesson: The lesson I’ve learned from participating in this sport is being independent, being confident by yourself, and not needing people around you all the time. It’s taught me to believe in anything I do outside of track and not to take negativity from people.

Kiersten Hicks (Dalhousie, New Brunswick)
As a high jumper, soaring to new heights is what it’s all about for Dalhousie’s Kiersten Hicks. Competing in the U16 category at the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships, Kiersten captured bronze in what would prove to be a hotly contested event. While the gold and silver medalists had already been decided, there was a three-way tie for bronze. But on countback, it was Kiersten who had flawless attempts up to and including 1.55m, and it was Kiersten to land the final spot on the podium.

Lesson: I’ve always played multiple sports but in the past year with track being one of my main priorities I’ve definitely learned to believe in myself on and off the track and learned how to focus on my goals until they are achieved.

Micah Landry (St. Stephen, New Brunswick)
Entering into the national championships as an underdog, St. Stephen’s Micah Landry found himself a place on the podium by performing at his best when it mattered most. Competing in the U16 category at the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships, Micah captured bronze in the 1500m steeplechase, placed 6th in the 1200m, and 4th as a member of the province’s 4x100m team.

Lesson: Athletics has taught me that nothing worth getting is gained without sacrifice. Your ability to act on your wants directly translates into results, and I think that is essential for meeting your personal and professional goals.

Jacob LeBlanc (Moncton, New Brunswick)
Already an accomplished athlete on the North American scene, Moncton’s Jacob LeBlanc took his talents overseas for the first time this year. Competing in the open T54 events at the Desert Challenge Games, a World Para Athletics Grand Prix meet, Jacob placed 2nd in the 200m, 800m and 1500m, 8th in the 400m, and 11th in the 100m. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Jacob captured silver in the 400m, placed 5th in the 200m, 6th in the 800m, and 7th in the 1500m. Representing Canada for the first time at the WPA U20 Championships, Jacob competed at the Sport Arena of the Swiss Paraplegic Centre, a world-renowned facility for para athletics, where he placed 5th in the 800m, 6th in the 400m, and 7thin the 1500m.

Lesson: One lesson that I’ve learned that is very cliché but even more true is that if you set your mind to something you can achieve that goal – it may not be the easiest thing to do but if you want it enough you will do anything necessary to achieve it.

Victoria LeBlanc (Saint John, New Brunswick)
Adding triple jump to her repertoire proved to be a smart move for Saint John’s Victoria LeBlanc, who continuously climbed the rankings all year long. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Victoria smashed her personal best in the triple jump, moving her from an 11th place ranking all the way up to the podium, capturing the bronze medal with a best jump of 11.74m. Representing the University of New Brunswick at the AUS Track and Field Championships, Victoria captured silver medals in both the long and triple jump. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Victoria placed 9th. In her first meet of this indoor season, Victoria broke the 12 metre barrier and achieved qualifying standard for the 2020 U SPORTS Track and Field Championships.

Lesson: The lesson that I have learned from athletics is dedication and perseverance. I’ve learned that it takes a lot of hard work and sacrifice to achieve your goals and you may have a lot of setbacks along the way but if you just push through those hard times you will eventually achieve your goals and it will be worth the wait.

Chelsea MacIsaac (Truro, Nova Scotia)
Quickly emerging a star discus thrower, Truro’s Chelsea MacIsaac launched herself into a near-podium finish at this year’s national championships. Competing in the U20 category at the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Chelsea improved upon her 6th place ranking in the discus throw, placing 4th and missing the podium by less than one-and-a-half metres. Chelsea also placed 12th in the shot put.

Less: Track and field is special because it can teach both teamwork and independence. In life, there are times where teamwork can lead to great success, but there are also times when it’s just you and you need to rely on yourself. You don’t always get that in other sports. It builds confidence knowing that you are able to thrive in a multitude of situations.

Heath Miller (Merigomish, Nova Scotia)
Already an accomplished thrower and national medalist, Merigomish’s Heath Miller improved upon her abilities and took her talents to new lengths this year. Competing in the U20 category at the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Heath captured silver in the javelin throw. Heath placed 1st in the women’s category of the Maritime Track League.

Lesson: The greatest lesson I have learned is to keep a positive attitude and steadfast tenacity. Sometimes during training or competitions things do not always go as you planned. However, if you remain persistent and maintain a positive mindset, then these will lead you to what you want to accomplish. These lessons from track and field have also helped me in my everyday life as it is essential to be tenacious and to have a positive attitude in every situation you approach.

Andrew Peverill (Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia)
A competitor in the grueling mid-distance events, Lower Sackville’s Andrew Peverill turned it up a notch this year and showed capable of challenging for podium positions at the national level. Representing Saint Mary’s University at the AUS Track and Field Championships, Andrew captured gold in the 1500m with a time of 3:53.30, shattering a twenty-eight year old record held by a later-Olympian. Alongside a silver medal in the 1000m, Andrew captured gold and placed 5th as a member of the university’s 4x400m and 4x800m teams, respectively. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Andrew placed 4th in the 1500m, 11th in the 1000m, and 12th as a member of the university’s 4x800m team. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Andrew placed 14th in the 1500m. At the AUS Cross Country Championships, Andrew captured a decisive victory, taking the win by over twenty seconds, and went on to place 19th at the U SPORTS Cross Country Championships. Andrew placed 2nd in the men’s category of the Maritime Track League.

Lesson: Athletics has taught me that no matter how hard you work at something, you have to enjoy it to really progress. If you love what you do, the work will come so much easier, and you’ll be so much happier in the long run.

Angus Rawling (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Graduating from the post-secondary educational institution that initially brought him here, Halifax’s Angus Rawling (originally from Calgary, Alberta) has emerged a fierce competitor in the region that he now calls home. Representing St. Francis Xavier University at the AUS Track and Field Championships, Angus captured gold in the 3000m with a time of 8:18.84, shattering a twenty-eight year old record held by a later-Olympian. Angus also won a silver medal in the 1500m and a bronze medal as a member of the university’s 4x800m team. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Angus placed 10th in the 1500m and 12th in the 3000m. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Angus placed 7th in the 5000m.

Lesson: I think the two biggest things that I’ve learned from the sport that I can take into my life would be goal setting and work ethic. Having the foresight and the planning to come up with goals that were both short term and long term is something that I have used both on and off the track. The work ethic is the part that has allowed me to achieve a lot of my short term goals, or at least put me in a position that on the right day you can even surpass your goals. Consistency in both these areas is something that I think is key in order to be successful in anything that you do.

Maya Reynolds (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Bursting out of the blocks with her eyes focused on the finish line, Halifax’s Maya Reynolds (originally from Markham, Ontario) achieved a new level of speed this year. Representing Dalhousie University at the AUS Track and Field Championships, Maya captured silver in both the 60m and 300m, and an additional two silver medals as a member of the university’s 4x200m and 4x400m teams. At the U SPORTS Track and Field Championships, Maya ran a massive personal best of 7.50 to claim bronze in the 60m. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Maya placed 21st in the 100m.

Lesson: This year especially, the number one thing that I have learned is the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle outside of just practicing and competing. I would say that putting in the work on the track is something I've always tried my best to do, but keeping a healthy diet, getting consistent sleep, and finding ways to destress are what I focused on this year. Relating this to my life outside of sport, I would say that it is essential to take care of yourself to do well in all aspects of your life. Showing up the best version of yourself allows you to be a better student, employee, and friend.

Maggie Smith (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Reigning queen among her events again this year, Halifax’s Maggie Smith showed that she is not only a rising star on the national stage, but also on the international stage. At the McGill Team Challenge, Maggie toed the line with 38 mostly-university athletes in the 1000m and 69 in the 1500m – she beat them all, broke the meet record in the 1000m, and narrowly missed a meet record in the 1500m. At the AUS Relays, Maggie joined forces with fellow Nova Scotians Katie Blunden, Carley Burrell, and Cara MacDonald to break the Canadian U20 indoor 4x800m record with a time of 9:16.16. Representing Canada at the Pan American U20 Athletics Championships, Maggie led from start to finish to capture gold in the 1500m. Competing in the U20 category at the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Maggie captured silver in the 1500m. Representing Villanova University at the NCAA Division I Mid-Atlantic Cross Country Qualifier, Maggie placed 3rd and was the first rookie/freshman to cross the line. At the NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships, Maggie placed 141st. Maggie’s indoor times of 2:46.81 in the 1000m and 4:24.08 in the 1500m were the fastest times by a female U20 athlete in Canada this year.

Lesson: I would have to say that my participation in athletics has allowed me to have good time management skills. As a student athlete I have had to learn to prioritize and make sacrifices to be able to accomplish what I set my mind to. The other amazing skill I have learned is how to build strong and valuable relationships. I have great pride in saying that so many of my best friends and greatest supporters have come through my participation in athletics.

Matthew Tanton (Summerside, Prince Edward Island)
Throwing at only three meets this year, Summerside’s Matthew Tanton had a short but impressive outdoor season. For an event as technical as the discus throw, practicing and perfecting the technique is key to success. At the Canadian Track and Field Championships, Matthew placed 7th in the discus throw.

Lesson: I would say that especially in track and field, the discipline and self-accountability is what I take away from it, because at the end of the day it's the work the athlete puts in which determines success, and I think that translates to life outside of athletics as well.

Craig Thorne (Quispamsis, New Brunswick)
While increasing hurdle heights often pose a challenge for athletes advancing through age categories, Quispamsis’ Craig Thorne has adapted with ease. In his first year in the U20 category and sprinting over 39 inch hurdles, Craig captured silver in the 110mh at the Canadian Track and Field Championships. Representing the University of Guelph in his first meet of this indoor season, Craig broke the elusive 8 second barrier in the 60mh over 39 inch hurdles, running a time of 7.98. At his second meet of the season, Craig ran a time of 8.16 in the 60mh over 42 inch hurdles, achieving qualifying standard for the 2020 U SPORTS Track and Field Championships. Craig placed 1st in the men’s category of the Maritime Track League.

Lesson: Track and field has taught me numerous things in life, but for me the biggest thing is being dedicated. Over my five year track career there has been many ups and downs – just like with life – and being dedicated with the goals in my life has kept me in a good place. When I start something, whether it’s something with track or school, I stay committed to it.

Erin Vringer (Saint John, New Brunswick)
While the sky is often said to be the limit, Saint John’s Erin Vringer is already landing on the moon. Competing in the U16 category at the Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships, Erin captured gold in the 1200m and bronze in both the 800m and 1500m steeplechase. Erin capped off 2019 with a twenty second victory at the Canadian Cross Country Championships, becoming the inaugural champion of the newly created U16 race. Throughout her years competing in the U16 age category at the Legion Championships, Erin has achieved the extraordinary feat of having won national medals in four distinct events.

Lesson: Participating in athletics has helped me develop a strong work ethic. This transfers to other sports I play and to my academics.

 

Nine of the award winners are repeat-recipients, having received an Outstanding Performer Award for their accomplishments in 2018. These individuals are Jack Berkshire, Laura Dickinson, Jordan Henri, Jacob LeBlanc, Andrew Peverill, Maya Reynolds, Maggie Smith, Craig Thorne, and Erin Vringer.

International Medals

World Masters Athletics Indoor Championships: 1

Silver – Peter Lawson (M50 4x200m)

Summer Universiade: 1

Gold – Sarah Mitton (women’s shot put)

North, Central America and Caribbean Region of World Masters Athletics Championships: 9

Gold – Patty Blanchard (W60 1500m)
Gold – Patty Blanchard (W60 5000m)
Gold – Bruce Rosvall (M55 800m)
Gold – Bruce Rosvall (M55 4x400m relay)
Silver – Bruce Rosvall (M50 4x100m relay)
Bronze – David Blackwood (M70 pentathlon)
Bronze – Peter Lawson (M50 400m)
Bronze – Alex MacEachern (M70 2000m steeplechase)
Bronze – Jo Welch (W60 80mh)

Pan American U20 Athletics Championships: 1

Gold – Maggie Smith (women’s 1500m)

 

National Medals

Canadian Masters Athletics Championships: 6

Gold – Bruce Rosvall (M55 400m)
Gold – Jo Welch (W60 weight throw)
Silver – Bruce Rosvall (M55 60m)
Silver – Jo Welch (W60 60mh)
Silver – Jane Warren (W60 weight throw)
Bronze – Jane Warren (W60 shot put)

Hershey Canadian Indoor Track and Field Championships: 25

Gold – Samuel Bourque (U20 men’s shot put)
Gold – Jordan Henri (U20 men’s 60m)
Gold – Jordan Henri (U20 men’s 200m)
Gold – Abby Lewis (U16 girl’s 2000m)
Gold – Erin Vringer (U16 girl’s 800m)
Silver – Oliver Arnfast (U18 boy’s 60mh)
Silver – Amélie Cormier (U20 women’s 3000m)
Silver – Keighan Decoff (U18 girl’s shot put)
Silver – Logan Johnstone (U16 boy’s 2000m)
Silver – Cara MacDonald (U16 girl’s 300m)
Silver – Cara MacDonald (U16 girl’s 800m)
Silver – Jaylin Pothier (U20 women’s triple jump)
Silver – Alex Quinton (U16 boy’s 300m)
Silver – Francois Richard (U18 boy’s 3000m)
Silver – Erin Vringer (U16 girl’s 1200m)
Silver – U18 boy’s 4x200m relay (Gabriel Gagne, Max Mazerolle, Austin Wamboldt, Brandon Haché)
Bronze - Amélie Cormier (U20 women’s 1500m)
Bronze – Keighan Decoff (U18 girl’s weight throw)
Bronze – Michael Johnson (U20 men’s pentathlon)
Bronze – Micah Landry (U16 boy’s 1200m)
Bronze – Jaylin Pothier (U20 women’s 60mh)
Bronze – Amelia Reid (U18 girl’s high jump)
Bronze – Francois Richard (U18 boy’s 1500m)
Bronze – Sacha Stover (U20 men’s 60mh)
Bronze – U18 girl’s 4x200m relay (Janelle Allanach, Emily Doucet, Erika Blackmore, Shelby MacIsaac)

U SPORTS Track and Field Championships: 8

Gold – Matt Coolen (men’s 60m)
Gold – Josh Hamilton (men’s 4x400m)
Silver – Matt Coolen (men’s 60mh)
Silver – Peter Collier (men’s heptathlon)
Silver – Bailey Smith (women’s 60m)
Bronze – Jack Berkshire (men’s 600m)
Bronze – Jack Berkshire (men’s 4x400m)
Bronze – Maya Reynolds (women’s 60m)

Canadian Masters Athletics Championships: 37

Gold – David Blackwood (M70 long jump)
Gold – Paul Gautier (M50 hammer throw)
Gold – Paul Gautier (M50 shot put)
Gold – Paul Gautier (M50 triple jump)
Gold – Paul Gautier (M50 weight throw)
Gold – Paul Gautier (M50 throws pentathlon)
Gold – Rob Jackson (M60 10000m)
Gold – Peter Lawson (M50 400m)
Gold – Heather LeBlanc (W55 discus throw)
Gold – Heather LeBlanc (W55 hammer throw)
Gold – Heather LeBlanc (W55 javelin throw)
Gold – Heather LeBlanc (W55 shot put)
Gold – Heather LeBlanc (W55 weight throw)
Gold – Heather LeBlanc (W55 throws pentathlon)
Gold – Bruce Rosvall (M55 200m)
Gold – Bruce Rosvall (M55 400m)
Gold – Jo Welch (W60 80mh)
Gold – Jo Welch (W60 300mh)
Gold – Jo Welch (W60 weight throw)
Silver – David Blackwood (M70 1500m)
Silver – David Blackwood (M70 javelin throw)
Silver – David Blackwood (M70 pentathlon)
Silver – Paul Gautier (M50 discus throw)
Silver – Paul Gautier (M50 javelin throw)
Silver – Peter Lawson (M50 200m)
Silver – Neil Penney (M45 high jump)
Silver – Bruce Rosvall (M55 800m)
Silver – Nikolay Ryabkov (M40 5000m)
Silver – Dean Strowbridge (M45 5000m)
Silver – Jo Welch (W60 200m)
Silver – Jo Welch (W60 hammer throw)
Bronze – David Blackwood (M70 100m)
Bronze – David Blackwood (M70 200m)
Bronze – David Blackwood (M70 discus throw)
Bronze – Paul Gautier (M50 high jump)
Bronze – Paul Gautier (M50 long jump)
Bronze – Jason Stewart (M35 100m)

Canadian Track and Field Championships: 16

Gold – Ben Brown (T34-53 men’s wheelchair 100m)
Gold – Jordan Henri (U20 men’s 100m)
Gold – Geneviève Lalonde (senior women’s 3000m steeplechase)
Gold – Dave Waters (men’s para seated javelin throw)
Silver – David Bambrick (men’s para ambulatory discus throw)
Silver – Ben Brown (T34-53 men’s wheelchair 400m)
Silver – Ben Brown (T34-53 men’s wheelchair 800m)
Silver – Jacob LeBlanc (T54 men’s wheelchair 400m)
Silver – Heath Miller (U20 women’s javelin throw)
Silver – Sarah Mitton (senior women’s shot put)
Silver – Christel Robichaud (women’s para seated shot put)
Silver – Maggie Smith (U20 women’s 1500m)
Silver – Craig Throne (U20 men’s 110mh)
Bronze – David Bambrick (men’s para ambulatory shot put)
Bronze – Victoria LeBlanc (senior women’s triple jump)
Bronze – Mike Tate (senior men’s 1500m)

Canadian Legion Track and Field Championships: 9

Gold – Mya Archibald (U16 girl’s high jump)
Gold – Keighan Decoff (U18 girl’s shot put)
Gold – Erin Vringer (U16 girl’s 1200m)
Silver – Noah Berniquer (U18 boy’s javelin throw)
Bronze – Keighan Decoff (U18 girl’s discus throw)
Bronze – Kiersten Hicks (U16 girl’s high jump)
Bronze – Micah Landry (U16 boy’s 1500m steeplechase)
Bronze – Erin Vringer (U16 girl’s 800m)
Bronze – Erin Vringer (U16 girl’s 1500m steeplechase)

Canadian Cross Country Championships: 3

Gold – Geneviève Lalonde (senior women’s race)
Gold – Mike Tate, (senior men’s race)
Gold – Erin Vringer (U16 girl’s race)

 

National Team Members

NACAC Cross Country Championships: 3

Athlete – Geneviève Lalonde
Athlete – Maggie Smith
Athlete – Mike Tate

IAAF World Cross Country Championships: 3

Athlete – Geneviève Lalonde
Athlete – Maggie Smith
Athlete – Mike Tate

NACAC U18/U23 Athletics Championships: 1

Message Therapist – Suzanne Moroney

Summer Universiade: 5

Athlete – Bridget Deveau
Athlete – Laura Dickinson
Athlete – Sarah Mitton
Athlete – Mike Tate
Coach – Steve LeBlanc

Pan American U20 Athletics Championships: 2

Athlete – Maggie Smith
Coach – Yvan Pelletier

WPA U20 Championships: 2

Athlete – Jacob LeBlanc
Coach – Ueli Albert

Pan American Games: 3

Athlete – Geneviève Lalonde
Athlete – Sarah Mitton
Coach – Heather Hennigar

Parapan American Games: 2

Athlete – David Bambrick
Athlete – Ben Brown

IAAF World Athletics Championships: 5

Athlete – Geneviève Lalonde
Athlete – Sarah Mitton
Coach – Geoff Harris
Coach – Heather Hennigar
Physician – Paddy McCluskey

 

“At all levels of the sport, 2019 was a great year for the Atlantic region. Atlantic athletes captured 104 medals at national championships and 12 at international championships, and placed 9 athletes on Athletics Canada national teams,” said Brandon Scott LeBlanc, Director of AtlanticU23. “At this time of the year, it is worthwhile to look at both the past and the future – the past to celebrate the accomplishments of this year, and the future to begin planning for success in the following year.”

Finally, we wish to acknowledge the many volunteers for the vital role that they play in building the sport in Atlantic Canada. To the coaches, officials, administrators, and various other volunteers of this great region, thank you for everything that you do!

With 2019 came much success – here’s to much more in 2020!



Hosted by New Brunswick-born track runner, administrator, and coach Brandon Scott LeBlanc, AtlanticU23 is an interview series with upcoming Atlantic Canada track and field athletes under the age of 23.

Facebook: @AtlanticU23

Twitter: @AtlanticU23

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