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International-conference-of-athletics-excellence
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User since:
Jun 25th, 2013
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bonstad said 2 weeks ago

Ahmed Run

Was that the greatest distance run in Canadian history?

Tripped up by Jacob 4 times then beats him on homestretch.

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  • getoffmylawn User since:
    Aug 31st, 2019
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    getoffmylawn said 2 weeks ago

    That was so satisfying watching Jakob run aimlessly getting in his way and watch Mo get another gear and blow by him in the final 100. Definitely greatest Canadian distance performance of all time. No one man or woman has medaled above the middle distance (womens 3000) I think right?

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Jacob almost destroyed Ahmed's shot at a medal with a lap to go, needs to be DQed when he races dirty. Complete disregard for other runners. Semi final was a clear DQ. How many of us knew Jacob was going to trip Ahmed the moment he got behind him?

    HUGE CONGRATS TO AHMED!!!! Takes the lead with a couple laps to go, stumbles with a lap to go, falls back to 5th with 250m to go, claws his way back to third in the final stretch.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Anyone got video of t hat? I need to watch that again! So satisfying!

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    So much argy bargy in this race!

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    From Letsrun said 2 weeks ago

    https://www.daserste.de/sport/leichtathletik-wm/videosextern/5000-m-finale-edris-schlaegt-die-ingebrigtsens-100.html

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  • meizner User since:
    Oct 8th, 2013
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    Meizner said 2 weeks ago

    As the great Brad Young once said: Spectacular!

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  • buddy User since:
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    Buddy said 2 weeks ago

    lets get a link up asap

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  • getoffmylawn User since:
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    getoffmylawn said 2 weeks ago

    https://www.cbc.ca/sports/olympics/trackandfield/moh-ahmed-bronze-medal-track-field-worlds-1.5303101

    Video is in the article

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  • weeiceman User since:
    May 23rd, 2015
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    weeiceman said 2 weeks ago

    That was a frickin' Classic! An unexpected fast pace throughout, oft not seen in Worlds or Olympics. Guts .. 2:27 for the final 1000m by Moh!... sub 4 mile pace for sure.. Got some of that Hockey Player grit..

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  • powerboy User since:
    Dec 11th, 2014
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    powerboy said 2 weeks ago

    very, very satisfying. I guess the pacing effort a few weeks ago really did indicate this level of fitness. But Moh also has proven to be a great racer. Congrats Moh!!

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  • bonstad User since:
    Jun 25th, 2013
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    bonstad said 2 weeks ago

    Love the interview here by Mo..."I said, F*** it, let's go". Great tough run. https://www.cbc.ca/sports/moh-ahmed-reflects-on-his-bronze-medal-performance-1.5303215

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  • rsb3 User since:
    May 5th, 2015
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    rsb3 said 2 weeks ago

    Awesome race ! I think Jacob trips up Mo 2 or 3 times, from behind, in the last few laps. Mo did well just to keep on his feet at one point. It may not have affected the final outcome, but Jacob should be DQ'd, just so he won't be trying to trip the leader as part of his future race tactics !

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  • clancyi User since:
    Jul 11th, 2016
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    Clancyi said 2 weeks ago

    Wow what a race. One of the best I have ever seen. A friend of mine asked if it was as good as the 72 Olympic 5000 with Pre and I had to say it was right up there. Well done Mo!

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  • oldster User since:
    Sep 25th, 2013
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    Oldster said 2 weeks ago

    Oh man! The Farah era is over and old-fashioned, multiple- tactics foot-racing is back!! Love, love, loved this race! Loved Mo's interview even more. My kind of athlete in every way!

    But, yeah, the Ingebrigten kid needs to smarten up a little before he'll be ready for championship prime time. He's going to ruin someone's gold medal race at some point if he doesn't-- maybe his own.

    This post was edited by Oldster 2 weeks ago . 
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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    What's ironic about this is it's exactly the kind of race that may have taken Farah down. But they were too chicken shit to try it until he was gone.

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  • bcbud User since:
    May 3rd, 2018
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    BCBud said 2 weeks ago

    Moh is crazy fit right now! Could we see a new 10k national record this year too? I think we will but of course it depends on who takes the race out

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    FITZ said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Clancyi
    "Wow what a race. One of the best I have ever seen. A friend of mine asked if it was as good as the 72 Olympic 5000 with Pre and I had to say it was right up there. Well done Mo!"

    Surely you're kidding. Pre would not have beaten Justin who was 10th. We are in a whole new era of running. A 13:20+ is nothing like a 13:00 tactical race. 1972 was certainly a great race...but there were 7 guys still in it with 500m to go yesterday.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iKt8_pkHgY

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  • clancyi User since:
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    Clancyi said 2 weeks ago

    Fitz give me a break man. I didn't mean the 72 race was anywhere as fast. Like that 72 race Mo's race was incredibly interesting and fun to watch. Also so impressed with his interview following the race..

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    Certainly Not Skuj said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Oh man! The Farah era is over and old-fashioned, multiple- tactics foot-racing is back!!"


    You know I love you!! But we will always disagree about "the Farah era".

    Farah was a f*****g genius on the track. He was able to control so many races, when faster (on paper) people were in the field. He gets the blame for what the other 12-20 (or whatever the number was) runners decided to do. The other runners had multiple opportunities to switch things up, to work as teams against Farah, to sacrifice, to experiment, and time and time again they crumbled, in fear, because Farah was THE BOSS. This perch that Farah occupied wasn't handed to him on a silver platter. He earned it, over the course of many races/years, and the other participants became willing pawns in the fascinating and thrilling game that Farah played. I bow to the man. I bow to his genius.

    Now....in a couple of 1500m races, he did not get his way. He had to go balls to the wall while others dictated, and the result was losses, and a couple of 3:28s. Again, I bow to the man.

    Every big city Marathon now sees eggs thrown against the wall. If it is a 2:03 or faster race, Farah will "suffer" like he did in 1500m. But damn, he still gets my respect.

    3:28 to 2:05. Wow.

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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Jakob should be DQd. As Moh ran by him in the final straight he went out to lane three to stay well clear of Jakob. Didn't want to be "accidently" tripped again in the run to the finish. Smart move by Moh.

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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Let me start by saying that I love the way that Mo ran. Aggressive and gutsy. Deserved the medal and if they actually tested in Ethopia, probably would have gotten Gold.

    I realize that defending Jakob is a little bit like a Liberal trying to justify their leader's actions, but I will try. Although he ran like an idiot, I don't think it was intentional. He just turned 19 and has had little to no experience running in packs, especially at longer distances. When he has been in packs he seems to body check and push more that you would expect from an experienced international athlete. Mo also has a super long back-kick that could interfere with someone 3m behind him. Jakob seems to be a good sport and the camera actually caught him still sitting on the track (post collapse) and clapping for the medalists. I don't think he was "intentionally" trying to trip Mo. Clumsy and inexperienced but not malicious IMO.

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  • nurmi User since:
    Oct 8th, 2014
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    Nurmi said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "I don't think he was "intentionally" trying to trip Mo. Clumsy and inexperienced but not malicious IMO."


    I tend to agree with this, he's young and has always run either against much slower athletes or in DL conditions with stretched fields led by a pacer. However, a DQ should not have to take intent into consideration, particularly as it is impossible to judge intent. If he is clumsy and tends to body check and push, one or two DQs will impress on him the need to be aware and stop doing that. Leave it unpunished, and there is no incentive to learn.
    It all goes in part to what I think is a problem with judging these events. We've seen for the last couple of years tons of DQs of 200m and 400m runners for stepping on the line once or twice during a race, no need for complaints from other runners. However, in mid-distance and distance races, it seems that sometimes one can push and shove as much as one wants. As a case in point, the Ugandan runner who ended up winning the women's 800m should have been DQ'd in the semis after elbowing her way through the middle of the pack into the leading position. She was stronger in the straightaway, but she did not bother to go around the other athletes with better positions, she just pushed them aside. However, those runners she displaced ended up qualifying and did not protest. So she was not DQ'd and ended winning the final. The only one with something to gain was Butterworth, who would have made it as the ninth time. But of course the Canadians were not going to protest what had happened in a different heat.
    So the judges end up abusing the rules to DQ athletes in some cases because they can use technology to make a clear-cut decision (foot on the line), but will not intervene in cases that require judgment (which is why we have judges in the first place!).

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Nurmi
    "I tend to agree with this, he's young and has always run either against much slower athletes or in DL conditions with stretched fields led by a pacer. However, a DQ should not have to take intent into consideration, particularly as it is impossible to judge intent. If he is clumsy and tends to body check and push, one or two DQs will impress on him the need to be aware and stop doing that. Leave it unpunished, and there is no incentive to learn.
    It all goes in part to what I think is a problem with judging these events. We've seen for the last couple of years tons of DQs of 200m and 400m runners for stepping on the line once or twice during a race, no need for complaints from other runners. However, in mid-distance and distance races, it seems that sometimes one can push and shove as much as one wants. As a case in point, the Ugandan runner who ended up winning the women's 800m should have been DQ'd in the semis after elbowing her way through the middle of the pack into the leading position. She was stronger in the straightaway, but she did not bother to go around the other athletes with better positions, she just pushed them aside. However, those runners she displaced ended up qualifying and did not protest. So she was not DQ'd and ended winning the final. The only one with something to gain was Butterworth, who would have made it as the ninth time. But of course the Canadians were not going to protest what had happened in a different heat.
    So the judges end up abusing the rules to DQ athletes in some cases because they can use technology to make a clear-cut decision (foot on the line), but will not intervene in cases that require judgment (which is why we have judges in the first place!)."


    A few comments on this as many people like throwing around "he should be DQ'd" or "he should NOT have been DQ'd".

    Applicable IAAF rule is 163.2 for obstruction and 16.3.3 for lane violations. Commenters really should have a read of those rules.

    As Nurmi noted, "it is impossible to judge intent" with respect to obstruction, so this becomes a subjective call by the Referee and unlike lane violations, there is no definitive line as to what is and what is not subject to a DQ. We are dependent on the experienced judgement of the Referee with a checks and balances process available through appeal to the Jury.*

    When making that subjective call, a number of things need to be considered, including:
    - what was the impact of the potential violation?
    - was their any perceived intent or negligence that resulted in the potential violation?
    - what would be fair for all concerned?

    For the Ugandan 800m runner in the women's semi, while her actions may have breached the letter of the rules, there was ultimately no impact on the other runners - no one who she contacted was prevented from qualifying for the next round. Looking at the interest of fairness, it may not be reasonable to DQ her in that situation. Perhaps a yellow card/formal warning would have been appropriate, putting her on notice that what she did was not cool and anything further would result in her being DQ'd.

    Had the incident occurred in the final, then a different case could be made that actual medal placings were impacted, so potentially a different ruling could have resulted.

    Lane violations can be made black and white - either the athlete stepped on the line (even only once) or they didn't. Since it is not reasonable to try and define what level of lane violation is acceptable (ie didn't gain enough advantage to impact the outcome), in the interest of being fair for all competitors, at this level of competition the absolute letter of the rule is followed.

    (At lower levels of competition there would generally be greater leeway on the application of the rule, but this would be a subjective call on the part of the Referee.)

    With respect to process, since some people seem to think it requires a protest to get a DQ. This is not true.

    The Referee can rule on any incident they observe or as reported by one or more umpires, regardless of any protest.

    If any competitor (or their coach) feels that a ruling (DQ) or lack of ruling (not DQ'ing) was not justified, they can protest orally to the Referee. The Referee would then make a ruling after looking at any available evidence.

    If the athlete does not agree with that ruling, they can then file an appeal to the Jury, who will make a final decision on the ruling.

    *At major international events like the World Championships, there are also IAAF appointed International Technical Officials (see IAAF rule 115). These are internationally experienced officials who have gone through an IAAF certification program and would act as referees for events to which they are assigned.

    ITOs and members of the Jury are identified in the competitors handbook for the World Championships which is available on the IAAF site.

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Certainly Not Skuj
    "You know I love you!! But we will always disagree about "the Farah era".

    Farah was a f*****g genius on the track. He was able to control so many races, when faster (on paper) people were in the field. He gets the blame for what the other 12-20 (or whatever the number was) runners decided to do. The other runners had multiple opportunities to switch things up, to work as teams against Farah, to sacrifice, to experiment, and time and time again they crumbled, in fear, because Farah was THE BOSS. This perch that Farah occupied wasn't handed to him on a silver platter. He earned it, over the course of many races/years, and the other participants became willing pawns in the fascinating and thrilling game that Farah played. I bow to the man. I bow to his genius.

    Now....in a couple of 1500m races, he did not get his way. He had to go balls to the wall while others dictated, and the result was losses, and a couple of 3:28s. Again, I bow to the man.

    Every big city Marathon now sees eggs thrown against the wall. If it is a 2:03 or faster race, Farah will "suffer" like he did in 1500m. But damn, he still gets my respect.

    3:28 to 2:05. Wow."


    It's a good debate, Skuj.

    When Farah won that last track 10k at Worlds, he earned my full respect as a fan for being able to take some serious pacing heat and still come out on top. On the whole, however, I think he failed to understand that sport is, in the end, about entertainment. Winning is certainly entertaining, but only to a point. When an athlete plays it safe and runs exactly the same kind of race every time, it quickly loses its appeal. Farah was certainly great, but he lacked courage and imagination. After that 3rd or 4rth global gold, he would have had a lot more fan appeal if he had decided to to take some risks and prove his dominance in another, more creative way, such as by trying to run away from a field, or attempting a world record. If had succeeded in either gambit, he would have become larger than life. If he had failed, he would have been a much more compelling sports figure than he turned out to be, which was as a kind of wind-up toy who could be expected to play it as safe as possible every time. In the end, does anyone really care what times this guy ran or how many titles he got if he never took a single chance in his racing career?

    Maybe simple dominance over a cohort of obviously weaker athletes (was the Farah era also among the weakest ever in global distance track, due to the preeminence of the marathon?) is entertaining to some; but, I like someone who shows a little courage and imagination, even (maybe even especially) if he/she fails once in a while.

    This post was edited by Oldster 2 weeks ago . 
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  • new-post-last-visitanonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "It's a good debate, Skuj.

    When Farah won that last track 10k at Worlds, he earned my full respect as a fan for being able to take some serious pacing heat and still come out on top. On the whole, however, I think he failed to understand that sport is, in the end, about entertainment. Winning is certainly entertaining, but only to a point. When an athlete plays it safe and runs exactly the same kind of race every time, it quickly loses its appeal. Farah was certainly great, but he lacked courage and imagination. After that 3rd or 4rth global gold, he would have had a lot more fan appeal if he had decided to to take some risks and prove his dominance in another, more creative way, such as by trying to run away from a field, or attempting a world record. If had succeeded in either gambit, he would have become larger than life. If he had failed, he would have been a much more compelling sports figure than he turned out to be, which was as a kind of wind-up toy who could be expected to play it as safe as possible every time. In the end, does anyone really care what times this guy ran or how many titles he got if he never took a single chance in his racing career?

    Maybe simple dominance over a cohort of obviously weaker athletes (was the Farah era also among the weakest ever in global distance track, due to the preeminence of the marathon?) is entertaining to some; but, I like someone who shows a little courage and imagination, even (maybe even especially) if he/she fails once in a while."


    It's about winning man.

    It's like saying the Maple Leafs didn't make the playoffs but they play with courage and imagination so that's okay.

    If you know how to win are you suppose to change your tactics just to please some fans? Hell, Farah won after falling in a race. If he switched it up and say ran from the front the entire race and came in second people would criticize him for poor race tactics.

    Prefontaine ran using the same tactics almost every race. Most great runners use the same strategy every time.

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