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U SPORTS PREDICTION CONTEST!
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Anonymous
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Anonymous said 2 months ago

Canadian 5km Champs

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  • oldster User since:
    Sep 25th, 2013
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    Oldster said 2 months ago

    Quoting: USS Coach
    "Still a very good run for Lyndsay. She is a great person and running exceptionally well. Kuddos to her"


    And here's the thing: She was close to tempoing the thing. I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't seen it myself (instructions were NOT to break 17). And we all know that she gets better the longer she goes. She's still has to get through a transatlantic flight and few days of jogging, but she has the potential to do something very special in Berlin this weekend. And it could not happen to a nicer or more deserving athlete.

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  • oldster User since:
    Sep 25th, 2013
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    Oldster said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Thanks again. And it actually is a bit of a hassle to do the paperwork for a master's record. Then there's the fact that people often think they will run even faster, and so plan to file the paper another time (someone had to talk me into filing for my M40 5k record, which I felt was soft at the time, yet never managed to beat!)."


    Case in point: I just checked and Lyndsay ran faster than the posted W40 HM record in Houston this year (1:14:29, to beat Krista D's 1:14:55) but hasn't bothered to do the paperwork!

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  • mauricew User since:
    Dec 5th, 2012
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    mauricew said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Case in point: I just checked and Lyndsay ran faster than the posted W40 HM record in Houston this year (1:14:29, to beat Krista D's 1:14:55) but hasn't bothered to do the paperwork!"


    Did Lyndsay turn 40 before Houston? The results list her as 39 on race day.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Case in point: I just checked and Lyndsay ran faster than the posted W40 HM record in Houston this year (1:14:29, to beat Krista D's 1:14:55) but hasn't bothered to do the paperwork!"


    She wasn’t 40 yet on the date Houston was run.

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  • oldster User since:
    Sep 25th, 2013
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    Oldster said 2 months ago

    Quoting: mauricew
    "Did Lyndsay turn 40 before Houston? The results list her as 39 on race day."


    I thought she was. If not, then extremely close. Next time for sure!

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  • mattnorminton User since:
    Jan 13th, 2013
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    mattnorminton said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Believe me, I wish you were correct! But, we had two athletes on the podium in 2013 and still didn't win. Not even close. We did the same just last year. Same result, although it was a little closer. The beauty and fun of XC is that it takes a deep team getting everything right to close the deal. We hope to be in the hunt again, but we don't think simply having the MacDougalls is going to be enough, crucial though they may be to the enterprise."


    The final scorer for a team (4th or 5th) is so important to a team's XC result!!! That runner can add so many points to the team's total if they have an off day. It really does make XC a team sport, even the displacers can make a difference.

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  • mauricew User since:
    Dec 5th, 2012
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    mauricew said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "I thought she was. If not, then extremely close. Next time for sure!"


    Like Catherine Watkins, Marilyn Arsenault and others who didn't started competing until their mid to late 30s, I think Lyndsay can continue to get quicker for a few years yet. Curious to hear what others think about such late entrants into the sport. Could they have been quicker if they had started training seriously at a younger age? I don't think necessarily so, at least for the longer distances.

    Good luck to Lyndsay and the others competing in Berlin on Sunday. Very interested to see how they do.

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  • steveweiler User since:
    Mar 28th, 2012
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    SteveWeiler said 2 months ago

    Quoting: mauricew
    "Like Catherine Watkins, Marilyn Arsenault and others who didn't started competing until their mid to late 30s, I think Lyndsay can continue to get quicker for a few years yet. Curious to hear what others think about such late entrants into the sport. Could they have been quicker if they had started training seriously at a younger age? I don't think necessarily so, at least for the longer distances."


    Something to think about:

    If one accepts such 'late entry' athletes as having approached or achieved their full potential in the sport, that would call into question the validity and impact of the 'Windows of Optimal Trainability' that are a basis for the Athletics Canada Long Term Athlete Development program, or at least their validity and impact for an entire event group.

    According to the Coaching Association of Canada document I just read, if you miss the windows of trainability, you will have a "skill and fitness deficit!" and you "will never reach your genetic potential!"

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 2 months ago

    Quoting: SteveWeiler
    "Something to think about:

    If one accepts such 'late entry' athletes as having approached or achieved their full potential in the sport, that would call into question the validity and impact of the 'Windows of Optimal Trainability' that are a basis for the Athletics Canada Long Term Athlete Development program, or at least their validity and impact for an entire event group.

    According to the Coaching Association of Canada document I just read, if you miss the windows of trainability, you will have a "skill and fitness deficit!" and you "will never reach your genetic potential!""


    Late bloomers need not apply. Isn't this an ageist policy, when you think about it?

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  • steveweiler User since:
    Mar 28th, 2012
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    SteveWeiler said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Andrew Jones
    "Late bloomers need not apply. Isn't this an ageist policy, when you think about it?"


    You "will never reach your genetic potential" is not a policy. It's either a true, or false, statement based on the relevant scientific evidence or it is a misstatement and over-generalization, i.e. that applies to some sports/event groups, but has little to no bearing on others.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 2 months ago

    Quoting: SteveWeiler
    "You "will never reach your genetic potential" is not a policy. It's either a true, or false, statement based on the relevant scientific evidence or it is a misstatement and over-generalization, i.e. that applies to some sports/event groups, but has little to no bearing on others."


    Sorry, I meant the CAC coaching document you quote is the ageist entity -- it seems to assume the common position that the brain's (and, by extension, the body's) full potential can only be reached with early training/teaching/coaching. Regarding the "windows of trainability" mentioned, with recent research (see Canadian Norman Doidge) we are now learning much more about the "elastic brain" and its characteristics -- including it's malleability as regards age.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Quoting: SteveWeiler
    "Something to think about:

    If one accepts such 'late entry' athletes as having approached or achieved their full potential in the sport, that would call into question the validity and impact of the 'Windows of Optimal Trainability' that are a basis for the Athletics Canada Long Term Athlete Development program, or at least their validity and impact for an entire event group.

    According to the Coaching Association of Canada document I just read, if you miss the windows of trainability, you will have a "skill and fitness deficit!" and you "will never reach your genetic potential!""


    Keep in mind that these athletes may have hit these windows of trainability in different sports and still developed the requisite skill and fitness.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Quoting: SteveWeiler
    "You "will never reach your genetic potential" is not a policy. It's either a true, or false, statement based on the relevant scientific evidence or it is a misstatement and over-generalization, i.e. that applies to some sports/event groups, but has little to no bearing on others."


    I'm going to disagree with this, sort of.

    Simply because someone is late to T&F (in particular running events) and missed the "window of optimal trainability" working with a T&F coach, does not necessarily mean that they missed it altogether. The development of speed after PHV could be achieved from sprinting in soccer, basketball or (heaven forbid) unstructured play.

    I will agree that the odds of it happening are less, but it could still happen, which is why we may see fewer and fewer late bloomers be very successful.

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  • steveweiler User since:
    Mar 28th, 2012
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    SteveWeiler said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Keep in mind that these athletes may have hit these windows of trainability in different sports and still developed the requisite skill and fitness."


    Sure, it's absolutely possible that the women mentioned were training aerobically from ages ~12-15 and maximized the Window of Optimal Trainability most relevant to their current racing focus.

    The context of the discussion was Maurice asking, generally, if athletes who "didn't started (sic) competing until their mid to late 30s" could "have been quicker if they had started training seriously at a younger age?" With only this information, it is reasonable to assume for this particular hypothetical that the WOT was not maximized.

    The Coaching Association of Canada makes a very clear, absolute statement that, if you miss the windows of trainability, you "will never reach your genetic potential!" I am partly posting this in hopes that people will think, for themselves, about how relevant this is for highly aerobic events.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 2 months ago

    The Coaching Association of Canada makes a very clear, absolute statement that, if you miss the windows of trainability, you "will never reach your genetic potential!" I am partly posting this in hopes that people will think, for themselves, about how relevant this is for highly aerobic events.

    By this thinking, I guess we'll never know how fast Priscilla Welch could have gone (2:26 at age 42), as well as Jack Foster (2:11 at age 41)! :(

    Welch began seriously competing at age 35, and Foster at age 32.

    Nordic skiing annals are famous for showing high-achieving athletes doing so in their late 30s, 40s, and even 50s.

    At least anecdotally we can show a significant number of examples of athletes (and others in other areas of achievement) who did well very likely because of their "late" beginnings. Sure, these cases may be considered as outlying cases, but the term "confirmation bias"occurs to me here -- in that sometimes antecedents and expectations will proliferate a popular idea that is far, far from always being true.

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  • oldster User since:
    Sep 25th, 2013
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    Oldster said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "And here's the thing: She was close to tempoing the thing. I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't seen it myself (instructions were NOT to break 17). And we all know that she gets better the longer she goes. She's still has to get through a transatlantic flight and few days of jogging, but she has the potential to do something very special in Berlin this weekend. And it could not happen to a nicer or more deserving athlete."


    Ok, so THAT'S a Canadian masters record (and one someone else should do the paper work on)!

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Sherry said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Ok, so THAT'S a Canadian masters record (and one someone else should do the paper work on)!"

    I am the person in charge of Canadian Masters Road records. I took over from Ed Whitlock on his death. As the instructions on the CMA website say, I can complete the form for a record set in an IAAF Gold Label event.
    https://canadianmasters.ca/cmawp/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Rules-for-Acceptance-2017.pdf

    That said, I don't follow all the Canadians racing all over the world so I need to be informed of possible records. We had 5 CMA records set in one race in London, ON yesterday (pending ratification of course). Lots of record setting going on.

    I do need proof of age so a scan or photo of a drivers licence or passport etc.
    My email address is on the records page.

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  • new-post-last-visitmauricew User since:
    Dec 5th, 2012
    Posts: 77
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    mauricew said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Oldster
    "Ok, so THAT'S a Canadian masters record (and one someone else should do the paper work on)!"


    Agreed. Should be no question about that one.

    CMA "Rules for Acceptance" 12.f
    When a Road Best is set in an IAAF Gold Label Race, in circumstances where the Records Chair believes that the event and course are acceptable for setting Road Bests, but the Records Chair has not been able to receive a completed Best on the Roads Application Form, the Records Chair will complete the application on behalf of the athlete, and present it as a recommended Canadian Road Best.

    And not to be overlooked. Catherine Watkins shaved 9 seconds off Marilyn Arsenault's F4549 record, with a lifetime best 2:40:11

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