• Login
  • |
  • Contact

    LIVE SUPPORT

    SEND US A MESSAGE

    ContactCode

    OTHER

    Email:
    info@trackie.com

    Voicemail:
    1.877.456.5544

Discussion Forum >>

International-conference-of-athletics-excellence
Reply to topic Go to last post
Avatar
Anonymous
Posts: 52133
thumbs_up 1
Report  ORIGINAL

eddieathlete30 said 2 weeks ago

How and when do hamstring injuries occur?

I struggle with hamstring injuries, which means I always dread sprinting. How about you? When do hamstring injuries seem to occur, in both sprints and hurdles? At what point in a race? And how?

Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 52133
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #1 

    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: eddieathlete30
    "I struggle with hamstring injuries, which means I always dread sprinting. How about you? When do hamstring injuries seem to occur, in both sprints and hurdles? At what point in a race? And how?"

    This is a very vague description of your injury, but the most common explanation on why hamstring pain is triggered is due to overcompensation. Which usually the facilitation of hamstrings are due to inhibitions to your buttock muscles.
    A safe protocol would be to google some glute exercises (Glute bridge,crab walks with band would be great) and do roughly 7 reps of 3 different exercises before your next run for activation and see if that takes the load off the hamstrings

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 52133
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #2 

    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    Commonly occur 60-100m in a 100m race, coming off a curve in a 200, after a big performance when you don't let yourself recover. I think most of the time it comes down to people trying to push back to accelerate when they are already upright and at top speed. It is a matter of maintaining a neutral pelvis and stepping down to maintain velocity once you are at top speed. People have a tendency to try and push back (push horizontally) at 60-100 to try and go faster. They end up with there pelvis in an anterior tilt, put stress on their hamstrings and slow themselves down prematurely. In that situation the more you try to push back the slower you go, its a matter of breaking that tendency. A general rule of thumb is a 12.00 second sprinter will hit max velocity by 40m, 11.00 by 50m, a 10.00 by 60. If you are a 12.00 sprinting trying to accelerate at 60m chances are you are just trying to hurt yourself at that point.

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 52133
    thumbs_up 0
    Report    REPLY #3 

    eddieathlete30 said 2 weeks ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Commonly occur 60-100m in a 100m race, coming off a curve in a 200, after a big performance when you don't let yourself recover. I think most of the time it comes down to people trying to push back to accelerate when they are already upright and at top speed. It is a matter of maintaining a neutral pelvis and stepping down to maintain velocity once you are at top speed. People have a tendency to try and push back (push horizontally) at 60-100 to try and go faster. They end up with there pelvis in an anterior tilt, put stress on their hamstrings and slow themselves down prematurely. In that situation the more you try to push back the slower you go, its a matter of breaking that tendency. A general rule of thumb is a 12.00 second sprinter will hit max velocity by 40m, 11.00 by 50m, a 10.00 by 60. If you are a 12.00 sprinting trying to accelerate at 60m chances are you are just trying to hurt yourself at that point."




    Alright, thanks. Would it be a good idea to pull up lame at any signs of pain, or hamstring injury?

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 52133
    thumbs_up 0
    Report    REPLY #4 

    Anonymous said 2 weeks ago

    You shouldn't feel hamstring pain while sprinting. If you do pull up and avoid hurting it worse.

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 52133
    thumbs_up 4
    Report    REPLY #5 

    eddieathlete30 said 2 weeks ago

    If I pull up, should I grab the back of my thigh to indicate the injury?

    Quote comment
  • new-post-last-visitanonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 52133
    thumbs_up 1
    Report    REPLY #6 

    XCC said 1 week ago

    Quoting: eddieathlete30
    "If I pull up, should I grab the back of my thigh to indicate the injury?"


    Sort of. Yes you grab your hamstring but it is actually to elicit attention or sympathy from onlookers not to indicate injury. In addition, you actually don't need to be hurt to use this technique. I often used when I was getting out kicked by an inferior opponent. I found it helped me save face with my teammates. They would think I was hurt rather than think that I got dummied by some chump who thinks he has 'speed'.

    Hope that helps!

    Quote comment
Anonymous

says…    

Quote Underline Italics Bold
Submit Preview

By posting on our forum you are agreeing to the following guidelines.

To help prevent spammers please
enter the two words below.


image-display1

 

Benefits of creating an account!

  • No need to reveal your real name.
  • Quicker to post (no need to enter the "two words" above each time).
  • Gives you the ability to edit your own comments and subscribe to topics.
  • It's free & quick to create an account!
Submit & Create Account

 

To help prevent spammers please
enter the two words below.


image-display1

To help prevent spammers please
enter the two words below.


image-display1