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Elementary School XC Super Meet
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Anonymous
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NCAAwatcher said 6 months ago

Prouse's Open Letter

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 3 months ago

    We should also be questioning why the athletic department inducted an investigation in 2014, only to reinstate Metcalf and allow him to continue abusing athletes.

    Indeed... the whole Athletic Department may be complicit and a larger investigation seems to be in order.

    If all of this is true (and one would think that there are enough "data points" to conclude that it is), then this is the type of coach that would, I would hope, be made to require a complete an enforced retraining to maintain standing, and hopes of future employment. If he refuses the overhaul, then he should be disallowed from coaching in the NCAA at any level -- and perhaps the USATF could stand up to legal threat and also bar him.

    The damage that a person like this can do to young athletes is immeasurable...this of course goes far beyond the playing field to affecting mental health and life outcomes.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 3 months ago

    Many athletes spoke out in defense of coach Metcalf, both male and female. While any body-shaming is certainly unacceptable, it is certainly interesting that different athletes had such vastly different experiences with the same coach. Just curious as to why that might be? Athletes that run well tolerate it, and those that don't look for someone / something to blame?

    I've seen female athletes that would not play HS sport because the coach was a "yeller," while other girls have told me they like coaches that get upset / yell when you screw up.

    Certainly if a number of people on the team came forward, there is a problem that needs to be addressed. Unfortunately, it seems that Metcalf feels he hasn't done anything wrong and therefore is not likely to learn anything from his dismissal.

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  • oldster User since:
    Sep 25th, 2013
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    Oldster said 3 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Many athletes spoke out in defense of coach Metcalf, both male and female. While any body-shaming is certainly unacceptable, it is certainly interesting that different athletes had such vastly different experiences with the same coach. Just curious as to why that might be? Athletes that run well tolerate it, and those that don't look for someone / something to blame?

    I've seen female athletes that would not play HS sport because the coach was a "yeller," while other girls have told me they like coaches that get upset / yell when you screw up.

    Certainly if a number of people on the team came forward, there is a problem that needs to be addressed. Unfortunately, it seems that Metcalf feels he hasn't done anything wrong and therefore is not likely to learn anything from his dismissal."


    I doubt this is a question of individual athlete's preference for a particular coaching style or other; abusive people always have defenders, because they are almost never abusive to everyone (often, they manage to be very nice to some people). And, most coaches are never accused of being abusive to anyone. To compel multiple athletes to approach admin with accusations of outright abusiveness (or to leave entirely) usually requires serial abusive behaviour. There seems to be more than enough smoke here to conclude that there's a serious fire somewhere. Good riddance to this d-bag. He's bad for the profession.

    This post was edited by Oldster 3 months ago . 
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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 3 months ago

    How does UW take so long to fire him? Surely there’s been other complaints earlier?

    As long as there’s no requirement to being a coach besides no criminal record this type of psychotic behavior will happpen.

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    Andrew Jones said 3 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Many athletes spoke out in defense of coach Metcalf, both male and female. While any body-shaming is certainly unacceptable, it is certainly interesting that different athletes had such vastly different experiences with the same coach. Just curious as to why that might be? Athletes that run well tolerate it, and those that don't look for someone / something to blame?

    I've seen female athletes that would not play HS sport because the coach was a "yeller," while other girls have told me they like coaches that get upset / yell when you screw up.

    Certainly if a number of people on the team came forward, there is a problem that needs to be addressed. Unfortunately, it seems that Metcalf feels he hasn't done anything wrong and therefore is not likely to learn anything from his dismissal."


    I would agree that there are many different coaching styles, and that athletes may react negatively or positively (or not at all, if the coach is particularly uninspiring). But having said that, there is no doubt a list of best practices for coaches, as well as areas of transgression that must not be visited. This coach, from many accounts, and over a protracted period of time, has not consistently done the best practice part, and has thus crossed into transgressions that are simply unacceptable.

    Metcalf may feel he is above reproach, but we'll see if that attitude helps him if he tries to land another job in the field.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 3 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "How does UW take so long to fire him? Surely there’s been other complaints earlier?

    As long as there’s no requirement to being a coach besides no criminal record this type of psychotic behavior will happpen."


    From this article: http://www.dailyuw.com/news/article_abb5a87a-6437-11e8-a5c0-e7f0c7a3b7cc.html

    This wasn’t the first time runners had gone to the athletic department with grievances. Following the 2014 cross country season, multiple athletes went to athletic department officials, and an investigation allegedly followed according to multiple sources who were and currently are in the athletic department.


    Later, the article relays this anecdote about possibly why they felt it necessary to approach the athletic department.


    Following the 2014 cross country season, a group of runners ran into Metcalf at a tailgate prior to the Apple Cup. Per Goodwin, Metcalf appeared to have been drinking and proceeded to publicly insult one of the female athletes, calling her “fat” and “slow,” and using profanity. Her friend, another runner stepped up to defend her, and soon the rest of the team knew of the incident, according to Goodwin.

    That, in part, soon led to the first investigation. According to Goodwin, athletic department officials had the friend come in to give a report, but she lied in order to protect her coach.


    Since there may have been problems with proving the allegations if some were hesitant to come forward, that led to him retaining his job on what amounts to probation.


    “It seemed to be that they were giving him a second chance of sorts,” the unnamed track athlete said. “I wasn’t around at the time but from what I’ve heard there was a one-year contract initially that he was re-signed for and that was supposed to be a test of what happened. From talking with other athletes it sounded like he was really mellowed out that year and really wasn’t interacting with the team much for the majority of the year.”


    So there was some attempt to deal with the situation, during which he "mellowed out" and interacted less with the team. During that time, the team did quite a bit better.


    From 2015 to 2016, Washington put together one of its best seasons in recent memory. The Huskies won their first West Regional cross country title in program history in fall 2015, and Metcalf won Pac-12 Coach of the Year during the 2016 track season. Metcalf remained in his role as head coach after the season.


    This improvement may have coincided with the athletes being allowed to do things like eating meals without him checking their plates.


    “[Metcalf] would literally come up to people, pinch them like this [gestures to side belly and rib area], and say ‘You’re looking a little chubby,’” Coughlin said.

    This led to unhealthy eating and training habits in those who were coached by Metcalf, athletes said. He allegedly would come into training table, specifically looking at and commenting on the food on athletes’ plates.

    “I would scramble to make sure that my plate was fine, so that he would look at it and it would be healthy or a small amount. That was always an issue,” said senior Rose Christen, who medically retired in fall 2016.

    “These are runners who are putting in 60 to 80 miles a week and probably not eating enough, and they’re telling them to eat less or eat different, and usually a solid third of the girls’ team was out on injuries because their bodies were just not able to keep up,” said Aaron Schlossman, a UW senior who dropped the track team after the 2016 indoor season.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    http://www.wbur.org/onlyagame/2018/08/03/washington-greg-metcalf-running-harassment

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    Metcalf will never coach again. He's scum that needs to be permanently kicked out of coaching. UW is compliment in failing to act on the problem when it was brought forth years ago. More heads need to roll not just Metcalf's.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    As a program, Washington has dealt with attrition more than other western rivals. In the past five years, 41.7 percent of long-distance Huskies have left the program, either transferring to other schools or retiring. Forty-nine percent of UW male distance runners between 2013 and 2017 — nearly one in two — left the program before exhausting their eligibility on Montlake.

    Washington’s competitors don’t lose athletes at anywhere near the same rate over that time period. Oregon, one of the top track programs in the country, has lost 21.6 percent of its male distance runners, and 27.7 percent of all distance runners. Colorado, a premier distance school, has seen 27.3 percent of its men and 26.7 percent of its women leave early. Washington State has only had 10.4 percent of distance runners — seven in five years — not complete their eligibility with the program.

    How do these early attrition rates compare to top USport XC teams?

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  • runningman User since:
    Feb 23rd, 2018
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    Runningman said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "As a program, Washington has dealt with attrition more than other western rivals. In the past five years, 41.7 percent of long-distance Huskies have left the program, either transferring to other schools or retiring. Forty-nine percent of UW male distance runners between 2013 and 2017 — nearly one in two — left the program before exhausting their eligibility on Montlake.

    Washington’s competitors don’t lose athletes at anywhere near the same rate over that time period. Oregon, one of the top track programs in the country, has lost 21.6 percent of its male distance runners, and 27.7 percent of all distance runners. Colorado, a premier distance school, has seen 27.3 percent of its men and 26.7 percent of its women leave early. Washington State has only had 10.4 percent of distance runners — seven in five years — not complete their eligibility with the program.

    How do these early attrition rates compare to top USport XC teams?"



    Interesting analysis.

    One thing I tell athletes to look at is the number of seniors are still competing by the time they reach the last year of eligibility.

    Most NCAA programs have very few seniors running distance events especially women.

    Why? i juries and lose of love of the sport. These athletes are run into the ground, are expected to compete all year and keep up their marks. Boy, that sounds like fun.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    What distance team in USports would have the highest attrition rate? It could be related to the team with the largest talent pool?

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  • runningman User since:
    Feb 23rd, 2018
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    Runningman said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "What distance team in USports would have the highest attrition rate? It could be related to the team with the largest talent pool?"



    Very good question. My guess the schools with the highest attrition rates are the most successful schools not the weaker ones.

    i doubt attrition rates are as high in Canada because we do not have an outdoor season this gives athletes time to recover and not feel that athletics is a full time job.

    Is Usports ever going to have an outdoor season?

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Runningman
    "
    Is Usports ever going to have an outdoor season?"


    When would you have it?

    Most schools end classes in early April and are done exams by the beginning of May.

    (CIAU used to have an outdoor season in the fall, but this runs up against XC.)

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Runningman
    "Very good question. My guess the schools with the highest attrition rates are the most successful schools not the weaker ones. "


    One could argue that having high attrition means they are a weak program. The goal not being to win but to develop athletes in the very sensitive U23 stage. What would be more interesting to find out would be the "normal" rate of attrition and see who is above or below.

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  • new-post-last-visitanonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 1 month ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "One could argue that having high attrition means they are a weak program. The goal not being to win but to develop athletes in the very sensitive U23 stage. What would be more interesting to find out would be the "normal" rate of attrition and see who is above or below."


    Success is measured by where teams finish not how many athletes are retained.

    goal for university coaches is to win not develop athletes for post collegiate running careers.

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