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Anonymous
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Anonymous said 2 months ago

When is the right time?

In light of this thread, https://www.trackie.com/track-and-field/Forum/college-commitments-2019/17089/, when is the best time to start running track? When did all these athletes start? My son is going into Grade 9 next year and is an all round athlete. He’s thinking to get into multiple events which I would assume requires a few good years to be competitive amongst his peers. Even if he just runs sprints, should he tryout for the track team in Grade 9? I’ve heard some people say it doesn’t matter until Grade 11, but that doesn’t make sense to me especially if a kid is trying to pursue athletics post secondary. Please let me know your thoughts.

Thank you!

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Keep going with the multisport model.

    Certainly run school track (and any other school team he can play on). As long as you are not burning the candle at both ends, let him continue to play as many different sports as possible and have fun doing so. If it becomes a chore / job by grade 11, he's done.

    If he's an all round athlete, he'll do fine in multi events. Most programs focus on multidisciplinary training at that age anyways.

    If you've got a good track club in town talk to the youth / junior development coaches (oddly enough, many of them are very approachable). Many programs have introductory sessions (8 - 10 weeks where you can try it out once or twice / week). If you find a coach (club or school) that tells your son he needs to focus on one thing at this age, run (pun intended).

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Thank you for the sound advice. I will likely have him limited to 1 sport per season as that seems to be the general consensus amongst professionals in the youth development field.

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    FITZ said 2 months ago

    Multi's post secondary involve 10-events. Many are highly skill oriented and require years to develop. In Canada the development model adds skills over a period of years. I believe they begin at the younger ages with 4 then 5 then 8 then 10. I believe hurdles are the 1st of the technical events introduced at a young age. HJ, PV and the throws take time to develop. Most clubs have competent coaches in many of the event areas to address and coordinate the development. High-schools do no have a multi-event focus

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Though running was an emphasis for me in highschool, in my junior year's a played as many sports as I could. XC/Indoor track/Outdoor Track, Basketball, Baseball, Tennis, volleyball.

    Then in my senior years where running was more important ran all 3 seasons and played baseball/golf in the spring.

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    You can start at any age. It's just about longevity. If you start younger chances are you may get injured along the way, or what some here like to say (peak early or burn out). However this can be avoided if you take the right precautions and train properly.

    Almost every athlete that has been the greatest ever started young. Maybe they weren't playing professionally at a young age, but they were training for their sport regardless of how good they were as youth. Some were great since childhood, others had to work harder later on to become great (ie. Brady and Jordan).

    If your child likes running the best thing to do is continue with sports that help develop motor skills for that specific sport, as well as activities that help to build an aerobic base (I.e. Swimming, soccer, rugby, hockey, basketball, lacrosse), activities that involve constant movement on the playing field. Many former Canadian greats in distance running have had a background in one of the following sports I mentioned.

    When an athlete enters their Senior years of Highschool then specialization can slowly begin to occur if he/she wants to continue. This I have termed the "Justyn Knight Approach."
    Some kids have the natural gift for running well at a young age, but sometimes foster their skill too early and get bored, and leave the sport or grow out of it.

    Best thing for any child is making sure "they want to be a runner" and "they aren't forced to be running." If a child wants to run laps at a young age and learn the basic fundamentals, I don't see an issue with it.

    But just know that the record setters in Canadian Distance Running for the males at the Senior Level, all were fairly good athletes Provincially by their middle years of Highschool.

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "You can start at any age. It's just about longevity. If you start younger chances are you may get injured along the way, or what some here like to say (peak early or burn out). However this can be avoided if you take the right precautions and train properly.

    Almost every athlete that has been the greatest ever started young. Maybe they weren't playing professionally at a young age, but they were training for their sport regardless of how good they were as youth. Some were great since childhood, others had to work harder later on to become great (ie. Brady and Jordan).

    If your child likes running the best thing to do is continue with sports that help develop motor skills for that specific sport, as well as activities that help to build an aerobic base (I.e. Swimming, soccer, rugby, hockey, basketball, lacrosse), activities that involve constant movement on the playing field. Many former Canadian greats in distance running have had a background in one of the following sports I mentioned.

    When an athlete enters their Senior years of Highschool then specialization can slowly begin to occur if he/she wants to continue. This I have termed the "Justyn Knight Approach."
    Some kids have the natural gift for running well at a young age, but sometimes foster their skill too early and get bored, and leave the sport or grow out of it.

    Best thing for any child is making sure "they want to be a runner" and "they aren't forced to be running." If a child wants to run laps at a young age and learn the basic fundamentals, I don't see an issue with it.

    But just know that the record setters in Canadian Distance Running for the males at the Senior Level, all were fairly good athletes Provincially by their middle years of Highschool."


    all very true. Look at top 10 U 18 and U 20 boys or girls. These kids have been around for awhile.

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    4 varsity sports in grade 9 and no way the kid makes honor roll. Stick to 2 unless the kid is already an A++ student.

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Just curious.....is he being enrolled in track because you are guiding him towards it or is it because he actually wants to without parental "guiding"

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "4 varsity sports in grade 9 and no way the kid makes honor roll. Stick to 2 unless the kid is already an A++ student."


    👍 I will want him to get settled in high school before taking on any more than 2 sports. He’s not an A++ student.

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    Anonymous said 2 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Just curious.....is he being enrolled in track because you are guiding him towards it or is it because he actually wants to without parental "guiding""


    I’m aware of the benefits of track and field as well as the transfer of the events to other sports. So I’m “guiding” him but he has the final say.

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