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Daily Tips >>

2020 U Sports Champs

March 27 - Tip by Blaise Dubois
Tip by: Blaise Dubois

Medical staff - Support for a runner, may it be for a high level one or not, must be done by a competent, specialized and comprehensive professional. For that reason he should never accept final recommendations coming from non runner professionals (physio, chiro, doctor, etc).

Blaise Dubois

Blaise Dubois
Sport Physiotherapy
Québec City, Québec

The Running Clinic

Blaise Dubois has become an international leader in preventing running injuries. He also acts as a consultant for the Canadian national track and field team, with which he has already participated in many international events.

View all Blaise's Tips

User Comments

  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 57354
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    Anonymous said 4 years ago

    So you are suggesting an athlete at any level should not accept final recommendations from a doctor, chiropractor, or physiotherapist that is not themselves a runner? So when making an appointment with one, do we simply ask the receptionist "does this professional run?"? Or do we wait until our first appointment to ask "Do you run? Are you a runner?"? Where/when exactly do you draw the line?

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 4 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "So you are suggesting an athlete at any level should not accept final recommendations from a doctor, chiropractor, or physiotherapist that is not themselves a runner? So when making an appointment with one, do we simply ask the receptionist "does this professional run?"? Or do we wait until our first appointment to ask "Do you run? Are you a runner?"? Where/when exactly do you draw the line?"


    I think he's saying a professional who doesn't deal with runners (not necessarily a runner him/herself).

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 4 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "I think he's saying a professional who doesn't deal with runners (not necessarily a runner him/herself)."


    Oh okay. Thanks. That's makes more sense. Otherwise it gets a bit tricky requiring your health care professionals to engage in certain recreational activities.

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  • lobster User since:
    Mar 17th, 2014
    Posts: 1267
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    Lobster said 4 years ago

    It would be the same thing for throwers. If the rehab person has never had to deal with very large specimens, with a history of moving very heavy loads in the weight room, keep looking.

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  • new-post-last-visitanonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 57354
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    Anonymous said 4 years ago

    I once got fitted for orthotics from our local professional who was not a runner. I made sure to specify that I ran at the varsity level and would need something very light. She assured me that there was a high-performance model she would order in. The final product was a terribly stiff orthotic weighing in at 4 oz each. Waste of $400. Recently I've been put in contact with a professional who works with runners to make an incredibly light, compressed cork orthotic that can even be customized to your spikes. Make sure they have an understanding of, and experience working with, high level athletes.

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