• Login
  • |
  • Contact

    LIVE SUPPORT

    SEND US A MESSAGE

    ContactCode

    OTHER

    Email:
    info@trackie.com

    Voicemail:
    1.877.456.5544

To help prevent spammers please
enter the two words below.


image-display1

TrackieTV >>

Enter video URL

Callum Hawkins - Commonwealth Games Collapse


Posted 7 months ago by Trackie | Source: BBC Sports

User Comments

  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 1
    Report    REPLY #1 

    Anonymous said 7 months ago

    This guy is tough! Scotsman...

    He's not allowed any assistance, right?

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 0
    Report    REPLY #2 

    Such a big lead said 7 months ago

    Too bad because he was over 2 minutes ahead at 39km when this happened...

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 1
    Report    REPLY #3 

    Ron MacLean's dog said 7 months ago

    Quoting: Such a big lead
    "Too bad because he was over 2 minutes ahead at 39km when this happened..."


    Shades of Jim Peters in 1954, except that he collapsed in the stadium and was more than 15 minutes ahead at the time.

    Quote comment
  • callhimhawking User since:
    Oct 15th, 2017
    Posts: 19
    thumbs_up 10
    Report    REPLY #4 

    CallhimHawking said 7 months ago

    I'll be back, guys...

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #5 

    Anonymous said 7 months ago

    I understand "no assistance". Is coming to someone's rescue considered "assistance" ??? So the onlookers would simply look on ( I understand photos were taken) without coming to his assistance. No compassion ?? They would have simply watch him.have a possible concussion, possible death ??? I cannot believe/accept our world is coming to this. There has got to be a more humane reaction. Where are our usual "coaches" reaction.

    Quote comment
  • obvious User since:
    Apr 1st, 2007
    Posts: 819
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #6 

    Obvious said 7 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "I understand "no assistance". Is coming to someone's rescue considered "assistance" ??? So the onlookers would simply look on ( I understand photos were taken) without coming to his assistance. No compassion ?? They would have simply watch him.have a possible concussion, possible death ??? I cannot believe/accept our world is coming to this. There has got to be a more humane reaction. Where are our usual "coaches" reaction."


    To answer your first question, yes, by the letter of the rule it would be outside assistance and the athlete would be subject to be DQ'd.

    That said, if it's at the level where you are talking about 'compassion', then maybe getting DQ'd is the least of the athlete's problems. However few spectators are going to want to be responsible for having the lead runner DQ'd (and unlike those watching the video, spectators would not have context for the condition of the athlete).

    This is where the race itself needs to be on the ball with their own medical people with authority to step in where needed.

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 6
    Report    REPLY #7 

    Anonymous said 7 months ago

    I'd like to see you watch your athlete, your neighbour, your own child, bang their head on a railing, and then stand by and do absolutely nothing. Tells me the type of person you "obvious"ly are.

    Notice none of the "professional" coaches that frequent this site, are willing to stick their neck out to comment. Where are they ??? There was no way that Callum was going to finish that race on his own: not even crawling on his hands and knees. Shame on the not-so-innocent bystanders and commenters.

    Quote comment
  • obvious User since:
    Apr 1st, 2007
    Posts: 819
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #8 

    Obvious said 7 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "I'd like to see you watch your athlete, your neighbour, your own child, bang their head on a railing, and then stand by and do absolutely nothing. Tells me the type of person you "obvious"ly are.

    Notice none of the "professional" coaches that frequent this site, are willing to stick their neck out to comment. Where are they ??? There was no way that Callum was going to finish that race on his own: not even crawling on his hands and knees. Shame on the not-so-innocent bystanders and commenters."


    You missed the explanation of context.

    Spectators would only see a very brief window of the athlete's condition. Those of use watching the video are able to see pretty much the entire train wreck and are therefore much more able to armchair critique the action (or lack thereof) of random spectators.

    Sporting culture, particularly at the elite level, is about pushing human limits, going beyond the pain and any other slogans that would go great in a Nike commercial. Spectators are EXPECTING to see athletes suffering as they try to maximize their performance.

    (Say we dropped you in as a boxing referee. Would you know when the point is reached where someone beating up another individual becomes REALLY beating up another individual and the fight should stop?)

    Then there's the Bystander Effect.

    The fact there are so many spectators, any individual spectator is much less likely to take it upon themselves to intervene in the race. They would logically assume that among all the race officials/medical personnel, there is someone more qualified than them who is watching, aware of the situation and in a position to take suitable action (like having the paramedics step in and remove the athlete from the course - forcibly if necessary).

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #9 

    Steve jones said 7 months ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "I'd like to see you watch your athlete, your neighbour, your own child, bang their head on a railing, and then stand by and do absolutely nothing. Tells me the type of person you "obvious"ly are.

    Notice none of the "professional" coaches that frequent this site, are willing to stick their neck out to comment. Where are they ??? There was no way that Callum was going to finish that race on his own: not even crawling on his hands and knees. Shame on the not-so-innocent bystanders and commenters."


    I am a coach and I would have been there (if it happened in front or near me) right away rregardless the DQ rules, his life may possibly have been in danger and it was obvious he was not in any way in control of his faculties. Are there situations where you are supportive without interfering, of course there are, but in this case Callum needed help.
    Those people should have interceded and administered aid right away.

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 47743
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #10 

    Andrew Jones said 7 months ago

    Compared to the inclemency of Monday's Boston Marathon, these are the really deadly conditions. Dehydration and hyponatremia (more common in slower runners) being primary dangers.

    28C reported when the incident occurred, and that makes the 7AM start time seems late, but the problem for organizers is that running the race earlier cuts into live spectating and local TV ratings...but of course this type of race in this locale should place safety first.

    The reports say that the aid/event staff were positioned every 500m so perhaps Hawkins fell between these safety nodes? If so, and given this event -- which could have ended horribly --, perhaps the policy needs to be changed to event staff w. medical personnel on the move?

    Quote comment
  • new-post-last-visitobvious User since:
    Apr 1st, 2007
    Posts: 819
    thumbs_up 1
    Report    REPLY #11 

    Obvious said 7 months ago

    Quoting: Andrew Jones
    "The reports say that the aid/event staff were positioned every 500m so perhaps Hawkins fell between these safety nodes? If so, and given this event -- which could have ended horribly --, perhaps the policy needs to be changed to event staff w. medical personnel on the move?"


    Most major marathons will have mobile medical staff (eg ski patrol first aiders on bikes).

    There presumably were escort vehicles with the lead runner that should have included a race official with the authority to call for medical and potentially pull the athlete from the race (if not, this person should be viewing the video feed).

    Masters events generally have a specifically appointed Safety Officer who has explicit jurisdiction over scenarios such as this (granted that's easier to execute for events that are contained within the stadium and not spread out over several kms of a road course).

    Quote comment
Anonymous

says…    

Quote Underline Italics Bold
Submit Preview

By posting on our forum you are agreeing to the following guidelines.

To help prevent spammers please
enter the two words below.


image-display1

 

Benefits of creating an account!

  • No need to reveal your real name.
  • Quicker to post (no need to enter the "two words" above each time).
  • Gives you the ability to edit your own comments and subscribe to topics.
  • It's free & quick to create an account!
Submit & Create Account

 

Related Videos