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Event Results >>

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Canadian Cross Country Championships

Kingston, ON
November 26th, 2016

Results courtesy RunSignUp 

These are Preliminary Results.   We'll update results below once final but also can check the above RunSignUp link. 

Senior Men's 10km

Place Bib Name Team Name Age Time
1 699 Ross Proudfoot Team Ontario 24 29:52.7
2 952 Lucas Bruchet Team BC 25 29:55.8
3 797 Trevor Hofbauer Team Alberta 24 29:56.6
4 850 Matthew Hughes Team Ontario 27 30:02.6
5 177 Evan Esselink SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 24 30:04.5
6 800 Rory Linkletter Team Alberta 20 30:09.7
7 935 Nicholas Falk University of Windsor Athletics Club 25 30:11.5
8 890 Andy Wacker United States 28 30:12.2
9 465 Sami Jibril Team Ontario 27 30:17.1
10 872 Thomas Toth Unattached-Manitoba 25 30:18
11 824 Mike Tate UNATTACHED NOVA SCOTIA 21 30:24.9
12 148 Justin Kent Team BC 24 30:26.9
13 92 Yves Sikubwabo Equipe Quebec 23 30:33.7
14 450 Robert Denault NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 23 30:36.3
15 932 Corey Bellemore Team Ontario 21 30:37.2
16 796 Jesse Hooton Team BC 21 30:39.2
17 993 Antoine Thibeault Equipe Quebec 22 30:41.4
18 97 Gareth Hadfield Team Alberta 24 30:42.9
19 153 Declan White Team BC 24 30:45.6
20 236 Blair Morgan HARBOUR TRACK 23 30:46.5
21 80 Emmanuel Boisvert Equipe Quebec 25 30:54.6
22 946 Forrest Simpson UVIC TRACK CLUB 23 30:56.7
23 487 Kevin Tree Team Ontario 23 30:59.9
24 385 Jack Sheffar LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 20 31:02.8
25 735 Hajin Tola TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 33 31:07.7
26 371 Kevin Blackney LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 25 31:08.5
27 802 Keenan Viney Team Alberta 26 31:10.9
28 91 Alexandre Ricard Equipe Quebec 28 31:11
29 651 Matthew McNeil SAINT JOHN TRACK & FIELD 22 31:11.1
30 48 Colin Fewer ATHLETICS NORTH-EAST 39 31:11.1
31 258 Dany Racine Equipe Quebec 25 31:23.6
32 333 Patrice Labont Les Vainqueurs 23 31:23.9
33 79 Keven Bdard C. A. Université Laval 24 31:26.4
34 144 Ryan Brockerville Team BC 27 31:31.7
35 606 Eric Wynands PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 21 31:41.3
36 194 Benjamin Raymond Equipe Quebec 24 31:42.8
37 600 Mark Schmidt PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 20 31:43.1
38 694 Delohnni Nicol-Samuel SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 25 31:43.3
39 229 Taylor Forbes HARBOUR TRACK 23 31:53.1
40 719 Bonsa Gonfa TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 26 31:54.3
41 87 Vincent-Hoa Mai C. A. Université Laval 28 31:54.5
42 845 Gabriel Ghiglione HARBOUR TRACK 22 31:55.5
43 736 Abreham Wagaye TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 29 31:59.8
44 716 Berhanu Degefa Team Ontario 30 32:02.8
45 489 Tyler White NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 22 32:06.4
46 235 Patrick MacKinnon HARBOUR TRACK 26 32:07.8
47 799 Matthew Hope Team Alberta 21 32:14.7
48 997 Robert Kanko PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 20 32:20.7
49 332 Guillaume Dupire Les Vainqueurs 30 32:25.6
50 238 Paul Rochus HARBOUR TRACK 22 32:29.5
51 864 John Parrott Unattached-Manitoba 30 32:30.3
52 648 Jeffrey Costen Running Room Athletic Club Ontario 24 32:30.5
53 228 Luke Charbonneau HARBOUR TRACK 22 32:31.1
54 662 Jules Burnotte Sherbrooke 19 32:32.6
55 485 Joey Stel NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 20 32:32.9
56 152 Bilal Shamsi COASTAL TRACK CLUB 23 32:34.5
57 578 Robert Asselstine PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 24 32:36.4
58 379 Jeremy Hick LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 23 32:37.5
59 237 Sergio Rez Villanueva HARBOUR TRACK 19 32:40
60 822 Gavin Hatheway UNATTACHED NOVA SCOTIA 21 32:41.5
61 991 Nicolas Deshaies Zénix de la Mauricie 24 32:42.6
62 226 Andrew Beardsall HARBOUR TRACK 22 32:43.7
63 104 Jelmer Van Den Hadelkamp Team Alberta 19 32:45.8
64 598 Clay Patterson PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 27 32:51.9
65 869 Derek Snider Unattached-Manitoba 31 32:57.2
66 839 Andrew Courchene Unattached-Manitoba 27 32:58.4
67 814 Logan Roots UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA 23 33:06.2
68 687 Hussein Hashi SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 27 33:17.6
69 260 Louis-Philippe Ringuet Kalenjins 19 33:19.4
70 469 Eric MacPherson NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 23 33:20.3
71 90 Flix Pouliot-Richard C. A. Université Laval 23 33:30.6
72 593 William Litchfield PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 21 33:31.2
73 700 Cael Wishart SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 21 33:36.2
74 583 Declan Colwell PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 20 33:37.2
75 795 Jared Welsh U OF S HUSKIES 19 33:39.7
76 384 Matthew Sheeler LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 20 33:46.8
77 320 Nathan Dehghan LES COUREURS DE BOIS 20 33:47.3
78 834 Jacob Cameron Unattached-Manitoba 23 33:54.3
79 458 Ali Ghadghoni NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 23 34:06.4
80 870 Thomas Somerville Unattached-Manitoba 21 34:07.5
81 230 Alex Green HARBOUR TRACK 27 34:07.9
82 840 Nick Croker Unattached-Manitoba 31 34:16.1
83 337 Ambroise Senee Les Vainqueurs 22 34:16.1
84 181 Zack Jones DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 22 34:18.6
85 664 Patrick Lehoux-Gagnon Sherbrooke 24 34:26.6
86 447 Esteban Clavijo NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 25 34:32
87 374 Chris Caddey LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 22 34:34
88 156 Louis-Olivier Brassard Corsaire-Chaparal 20 34:36.9
89 638 Robert Gustas RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 26 34:42.4
90 141 Daniel Ribi Cirrus de l'Outaouais 24 34:42.9
91 470 Andrew McColl NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 22 34:52.3
92 543 Ryan MacDonell OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 24 34:58.2
93 375 Elliot De Lange LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 23 35:02
94 552 Jay Sneddon OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 23 35:05.5
95 357 Paul Cochrane LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 27 35:36.6
96 423 Steven McElligott McGill Olympic Club 33 35:37.9
97 555 Adrian Tsang OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 26 35:45.7
98 734 Daniello Tetangco TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 20 35:51.2
99 136 Maxime Lemieux Cirrus de l'Outaouais 25 36:41.8
100 490 Chun Cheung Yuen NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 24 36:44.5
101 637 Tyler Cassidy RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 23 39:21.7

Senior Women's 10km

Place Bib Name Team Name Age Time
1 904 Sasha Gollish Team Ontario 34 33:53.5
2 953 Rachel Cliff Team BC 28 34:03.4
3 790 Claire Sumner Team Alberta 21 34:06.6
4 848 Kathryn Harrison Unattached-Manitoba 27 34:11.1
5 907 Rachel Hannah Team Ontario 30 34:12.8
6 582 Victoria Coates Team Ontario 25 34:21.5
7 819 Jillian Forsey UNATTACHED NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR 21 34:33.1
8 290 Lisa Brooking Team BC 29 34:35.4
9 601 Julie-Anne Staehli Team Ontario 22 34:52.2
10 697 Heather Petrick SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 21 34:59.7
11 363 Stefanie Smith LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 21 35:08.4
12 645 Emily Setlack Team Alberta 36 35:10.9
13 225 Colleen Wilson HALIFAST ATHLETICS 24 35:25.6
14 50 Lindsay Carson ATHLETICS YUKON 27 35:27.7
15 903 Mary Claire Geneau Team Ontario 24 35:31.3
16 425 Melanie Myrand Equipe Quebec 31 35:41.5
17 722 Dehininet Jara TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 32 35:45.9
18 588 Clara Langley PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 21 35:49.1
19 362 Leslie Sexton Team Ontario 29 35:49.3
20 82 Anne-Marie Comeau Equipe Quebec 20 36:06.4
21 823 Ashley Ryer UNATTACHED NOVA SCOTIA 28 36:09.1
22 957 Arianne Raby Equipe Quebec 28 36:10.6
23 701 Sarah Wismer SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 20 36:14.5
24 955 Robyn Mildren Team BC 26 36:20.9
25 803 Alycia Butterworth Team BC 24 36:31.8
26 446 Beatrice Cigagna NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 20 36:32.2
27 640 Alecia Kallos Team Alberta 26 36:41.3
28 451 Laura Desjardins NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 28 36:48.4
29 64 Stephanie Johnston BRANTFORD T.F.C. 20 36:49.3
30 389 Emma Tallman LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 25 36:52.6
31 641 Jennifer Norminton Team Alberta 33 36:54.3
32 587 Lindsay Kary PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 21 37:05.5
33 419 Jullien Flynn Equipe Quebec 23 37:15.6
34 646 Tara Struyk Team Alberta 35 37:24.6
35 211 Katie Fisher GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 20 37:31.6
36 943 Chloe Hegland Team BC 20 37:37.4
37 721 Liza Howard TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 28 37:44.5
38 315 Danielle Thiel LEGACY ATHLETICS 24 37:51.5
39 636 Taylor Carlin RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 22 37:53.6
40 102 Emma Neigel Team Alberta 23 38:12.7
41 635 Shari Boyle RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 43 38:15.4
42 541 Isabelle Kanz OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 23 38:16.7
43 420 Georgia Hamilton Equipe Quebec 21 38:21.5
44 279 Heather Maxfield LAKEHEAD RUNNING 24 38:28.7
45 204 Catherine Gagnon Equipe Quebec 26 38:29.8
46 770 Mary Strain TRACK NORTH ATHLETIC CLUB 22 38:48.3
47 712 Yeabsira Abera TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 19 38:54.2
48 616 Brittany Elliott RIVERSDALE ATHLETICS TRACK 25 38:55.4
49 264 Claire Amy Valade Kalenjins 20 39:04.6
50 772 Katie Wismer TRACK NORTH ATHLETIC CLUB 23 39:07
51 639 Jessica Kaiser RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 29 39:08
52 647 Vanessa Trofimenkoff RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 22 39:21.6
53 948 Lindsey Butterworth Team BC 24 39:25.6
54 561 Amanda Wilkins PEARLGATE TRACK AND FIELD CLUB 25 39:35.1
55 262 Nomie St-Laurent Kalenjins 19 40:04.7
56 717 Sentayehu Gebremedhin TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 29 40:21
57 768 Jenny Bottomley TRACK NORTH ATHLETIC CLUB 21 40:23.3
58 94 Claudia Belanger CALTAF ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 20 40:59.2
59 234 Lauren Locco HARBOUR TRACK 20 41:20
60 767 Alyssa Bedard TRACK NORTH ATHLETIC CLUB 24 42:42.2
61 731 Marija Radivojevic TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 39 45:21.2
62 643 Anna Peacocke RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA 24 46:38.2

Junior Men's 8km

Place Bib Name Team Name Age Time
1 747 Ehab El-Sandali Toronto West Athletics 19 24:49.2
2 986 Mitchell Ubene Team Ontario 18 24:53.3
3 979 Miles Matthews WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 19 24:56.8
4 777 Stefan Daniel Team Alberta 19 25:00.2
5 893 Andrew Alexander Team Ontario 17 25:02.7
6 311 Andrew Shepherd LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 25:05.6
7 207 Graham Baird GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 17 25:05.9
8 83 Jean-Simon Desgagns Equipe Quebec 18 25:06.3
9 291 Nickolas Colyn Team BC 19 25:10.5
10 811 Kieran Lumb Team BC 18 25:14.5
11 584 Millar Coveney PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 18 25:16.8
12 677 Braydon Clarke SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 25:17.9
13 668 Matthew Courtenay Team Ontario 17 25:18.4
14 912 Robert Lawand UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 19 25:22.4
15 665 Perry MacKinnon Equipe Quebec 18 25:24.2
16 842 Owen Day Unattached-Manitoba 18 25:26.2
17 650 Brady Graves SAINT JOHN TRACK & FIELD 18 25:27.3
18 631 Louis-Carlos Vargas Rive-Sud 19 25:27.4
19 65 Kyle Madden BRANTFORD T.F.C. 18 25:28.7
20 81 Emmanuel Champagne Equipe Quebec 19 25:32.6
21 703 Ben Workman SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 19 25:34.5
22 999 Muhumed Sirage LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 19 25:37
23 278 Jordan MacIntosh LAKEHEAD RUNNING 17 25:37
24 133 Andrew Peverill CHEBUCTO ATHLETICS 17 25:40.6
25 944 Joshua Kozelj Team BC 18 25:42.1
26 155 Emile Brassard Corsaire-Chaparal 19 25:45.7
27 657 Kevin Robertson Equipe Quebec 18 25:49.7
28 571 Ibrahim Kedir Team Ontario 16 25:49.7
29 103 Angus Rawling Team Alberta 19 25:51.3
30 940 Jacob Rothera University of Windsor Athletics Club 19 25:51.8
31 328 Jonathan Stoppa LES COUREURS DE BOIS 17 25:54.4
32 383 Brad Sheeler LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 17 25:54.5
33 975 Josh Kellier WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 19 25:55.9
34 183 Josh Martin Team Ontario 18 25:59.6
35 545 Michael Mather OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 17 26:01
36 833 Steven Bruun Unattached-Manitoba 18 26:03.1
37 942 Chet Goerzen Team BC 18 26:06.3
38 919 Joshua McGillivray UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 18 26:07.7
39 789 Jacques Saayman Team Prairie 19 26:11.8
40 289 Thomas Fafard Equipe Quebec 17 26:12.7
41 781 Jonathan Guidinger Team Alberta 19 26:12.8
42 270 Matt Flood Kingston Track & Field Club 19 26:17.3
43 950 Thomas Nobbs VANCOUVER OLYMPIC CLUB 17 26:18.7
44 787 Greg Ord Team Alberta 18 26:19.1
45 945 Alexander Nemethy Team BC 19 26:22.6
46 591 Dakota Lavery PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 19 26:23.4
47 974 Brendan Heikkinen WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 26:25.3
48 280 Derek Patterson LAKEHEAD RUNNING 17 26:27.3
49 513 Sean Bergman Team BC 18 26:31.5
50 981 Enrique Nepomuceno WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 19 26:31.7
51 426 Dylan Alick MISSISSAUGA T.F.C. 18 26:33.8
52 832 Alex Broekhuyse Unattached-Manitoba 17 26:38.4
53 585 Alex Drover PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 17 26:40.4
54 698 David Poloni SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 26:40.8
55 286 Mitch De Lange Lakeshore Athletic Club 17 26:41.5
56 900 Simon Egzaw Team Ontario 19 26:43.3
57 84 Flix Duchesne C. A. Université Laval 19 26:48.8
58 778 Callum Drever Team Prairie 19 26:48.9
59 752 Timothy Mustard Toronto West Athletics 19 26:52.3
60 783 Alexander Howells Team Prairie 18 26:52.7
61 672 Ethan Loucks SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 17 26:54.1
62 370 Justin Attfield LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 18 26:57.6
63 653 Abderaouf Hani Saint-Laurent Sélect 18 27:00.9
64 170 Andrew Brown DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 17 27:01.1
65 325 Adam Paquette LES COUREURS DE BOIS 19 27:08.5
66 961 Quinn Cannella WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 27:11.7
67 66 Noah Tinevez BRANTFORD T.F.C. 18 27:12.1
68 134 Antoine Blanger Rannou Cirrus de l'Outaouais 17 27:15.8
69 195 Brandon Vail Team Alberta 17 27:21.3
70 690 Caleb Main SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 27:24.5
71 378 Mitchell Heyink LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 18 27:24.6
72 815 Malcolm Southerland UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA 18 27:25.7
73 674 Ryan Tyrrell SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 18 27:29.3
74 570 Edward Hayfron PHOENIX ATHLETICS ASSOC. OF ONTARIO 18 27:31
75 909 Jerome Jude UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 18 27:35.4
76 782 Lucas Harrison Team Prairie 18 27:36.9
77 673 Justyn Tyrrell SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 19 27:37.6
78 592 Cameron Linscott PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 18 27:39
79 556 Lucas Zanetti OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 16 27:39.5
80 255 Vincent Forest-Richard Kalenjins 19 27:44
81 805 Miles Dignum UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA 18 27:49.9
82 984 Lance Tofflemire WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 27:51.8
83 670 Isaiah Frielink SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 17 27:52.1
84 741 Miles Avalos Toronto West Athletics 18 27:53.6
85 282 Josh Stovel LAKEHEAD RUNNING 18 27:54.7
86 849 Kale Heino Unattached-Manitoba 19 27:54.8
87 794 Alexander McBride Team Prairie 18 27:58.4
88 198 Gregory Lopez-Bondi ETOBICOKE TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 27:59.6
89 369 Aidan Attema LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 19 28:04
90 284 Adam Armstrong Lakeshore Athletic Club 18 28:11.7
91 312 Bradley Shepherd LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 28:14.6
92 299 Sandy Freeland LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 28:26.7
93 95 Jonah Brown Team Prairie 18 28:27.4
94 705 Josh Zilles SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 19 28:29.7
95 563 Sean Ibbott PETERBOROUGH LEGION TRACK CLUB 18 28:35.6
96 669 Sam Cumming SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 15 28:36
97 540 Matthew Hickey OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 17 28:41.6
98 287 Aaron Veenstra Lakeshore Athletic Club 17 28:44
99 618 Karl Belley Rive-Sud 18 28:48.3
100 725 Kevin Malas TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 18 29:42.7
101 288 Derek Veenstra Lakeshore Athletic Club 19 30:07
102 730 Abdi Nur TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 18 30:39.6
103 628 Jacob Rousseau Rive-Sud 18 30:48.8
104 297 Addison Derhak LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 30:49.5
105 877 Justyn White Unattached-Manitoba 19 31:32.6
106 509 Carter Henschel NORTH BAY LEGION 18 32:29
107 285 Malachi Clark Lakeshore Athletic Club 19 33:22.8
108 205 Xavier Girard Fleur de Lys 18 34:09.5

Junior Women's 6km 

Place Bib Name Team Name Age Time
1 512 Hannah Bennison Team BC 17 20:35.1
2 594 Brogan MacDougall Team Ontario 16 20:47.9
3 702 Hannah Woodhouse SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 19 20:54.3
4 913 Martha MacDonald Team Ontario 17 20:58.6
5 276 Hanna Johnston Team Ontario 17 21:07.2
6 78 Catherine Beauchemin Equipe Quebec 18 21:07.8
7 546 Shona McCulloch OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 17 21:15.9
8 86 Jessy Lacourse Equipe Quebec 19 21:25.8
9 683 Madeleine Ghazarian SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 21:26.7
10 684 Sevanne Ghazarian Team Ontario 17 21:29.9
11 150 Christina Sevsek Team BC 17 21:35.4
12 53 Laura Dickinson ATHLETISME SUD-EST SOUTH EAST ATHLETICS 17 21:37.4
13 806 Veronika Fagan Team BC 19 21:50.7
14 151 Julie Sevsek Team BC 17 21:51.1
15 889 Candace Jones United States 19 21:52.8
16 303 Christine Laurie Team Ontario 17 21:56.1
17 892 Christiana Agustin UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 19 21:56.2
18 196 Jade Brub Equipe Quebec 19 21:57.3
19 406 Danae Keddie Team Prairie 18 21:59.5
20 888 Shayna Uhryn Team Prairie 18 22:01.9
21 176 Hiley Dobbs DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 17 22:05.3
22 928 Haley Walker UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 16 22:08.3
23 209 Jenna Clayworth Team Ontario 17 22:08.7
24 293 Joanna Williams Team BC 19 22:12.1
25 188 Sylvia Russell DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 18 22:12.7
26 124 Kylee Raftis Central Toronto Athletic Club 17 22:23.3
27 550 Keili Shepherd OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 16 22:27.7
28 185 Katelyn Murphy DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 18 22:33.2
29 292 Mikaela Smart Team BC 19 22:34.4
30 989 Erin Valgardson Team Prairie 16 22:36
31 129 Miranda Thompson Central Toronto Athletic Club 17 22:41
32 696 Stephanie Parsons SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 22:44.5
33 929 Jade Watson UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 16 22:45
34 908 Somerset Jarvis UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 19 22:56.9
35 808 Bailey Haugan UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA 17 22:59.9
36 655 Laurianne Lpine Equipe Quebec 18 23:15.2
37 376 Dana Earhart LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 18 23:17.9
38 178 Gillian Fleming DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 17 23:18.5
39 67 Natalie Verschoor BRANTFORD T.F.C. 17 23:18.6
40 227 Megan Black HARBOUR TRACK 19 23:20.4
41 891 Sarah Wills United States 18 23:22.4
42 564 Sarah Law PETERBOROUGH LEGION TRACK CLUB 19 23:28
43 825 Meagan Adams Unattached-Manitoba 19 23:29.1
44 652 Elodie De Coene Equipe Quebec 18 23:30.5
45 93 Sandrine Veillette Equipe Quebec 18 23:30.8
46 691 Francesca Maltais SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 23:36.1
47 784 Meghan Manor Team Prairie 18 23:39.7
48 656 Genevive Paquin Saint-Laurent Sélect 18 23:49.7
49 304 Elizabeth Laurie LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 18 23:55.6
50 576 Brittany Alkerton PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 17 24:08.5
51 671 Justine Glass SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 18 24:09.6
52 554 Maeliss Trapeau OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 17 24:10
53 256 Klo Gervais-Ppin Kalenjins 19 24:22.5
54 567 Bianca Tavares PETERBOROUGH LEGION TRACK CLUB 18 24:26.1
55 780 Sarah Forman Team Prairie 18 24:42.4
56 658 Andreea Tanase Saint-Laurent Sélect 17 24:54.1
57 172 Lauren Crawley DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 17 25:15.7
58 858 Julianna Manserra Unattached-Manitoba 17 25:34.3
59 381 Bailey Milos LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 18 26:11.4
60 171 Amanda Bull DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 17 26:23.1
61 62 Alexandra Devries BRANTFORD T.F.C. 18 27:56.4

Youth Men's 6km

Place Bib Name Team Name Age Time
1 609 Tyler Dozzi Team BC 17 18:50.9
2 453 Joshua Desouza Team Ontario 16 18:59.6
3 191 Max Turek Team Ontario 17 19:06.2
4 474 Nicholas Mota Team Ontario 15 19:07.8
5 174 Cameron Dean Team Ontario 16 19:16.7
6 345 Marcel Scheele LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 17 19:19
7 688 Gavin Hughes SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 19:19.9
8 792 Maximus Thiessen Team Alberta 16 19:21.2
9 941 Brendan Simone University of Windsor Athletics Club 17 19:21.3
10 452 Jonathan Desouza NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 16 19:24.3
11 995 Aaron Ahl Team Alberta 17 19:25.4
12 681 Liam Donnelly SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 19:31.8
13 241 Charlie Dannatt Team BC 17 19:33.3
14 298 John Fish LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 19:35.9
15 114 Alex Hoerner Central Toronto Athletic Club 17 19:36.4
16 500 Campbell Lee NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 16 19:36.5
17 693 Eric Morris Team Ontario 16 19:37.6
18 167 Matthew Bridger DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 16 19:37.6
19 562 Gustav Finley PETERBOROUGH LEGION TRACK CLUB 17 19:37.7
20 963 Arseniy Chertov WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 19:38.1
21 189 Alanzo Ryan DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 17 19:38.1
22 685 Cole Hannam SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 19:38.3
23 372 Evan Burke LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 15 19:41.4
24 689 Callum MacGregor SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 19:41.6
25 738 Grant Warburton TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 17 19:41.7
26 956 Roberto Pelayo-Mazzone Team BC 17 19:41.7
27 403 Aaron Boyle Team Alberta 17 19:42.1
28 607 Angus Brown Team BC 17 19:42.1
29 962 Chase Canty WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 19:43
30 682 Zachary Matthew Frangos SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 19:43.7
31 407 Tyson Keddie Team Alberta 17 19:44.4
32 319 Thomas Csisztu LES COUREURS DE BOIS 17 19:44.6
33 130 Nicolas Tralli Team Ontario 17 19:44.7
34 608 Kalum Delaney PRAIRIE INN HARRIERS RACING TEAM 16 19:46
35 894 Marcel Aubry UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 16 19:46.6
36 676 Nicholas Bannon SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 19:53.2
37 615 Kyle Caie Team SK 17 19:55.2
38 966 Noah Costa WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 19:56.9
39 851 Marcus Kemp Unattached-Manitoba 15 19:57.3
40 969 Andrew Davies WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:00.2
41 680 Gregory Danayan SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 20:01.1
42 659 Marc-Andr Trudeau Perron Equipe Quebec 16 20:02.5
43 377 Kyle Farquharson LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 17 20:02.8
44 455 Ryan Fraccaro NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 17 20:03.3
45 101 Liam Murray Team Prairie 17 20:03.5
46 776 Juan Celis U OF C ATHLETICS CLUB 17 20:05
47 149 Dawson Ribeiro Team BC 17 20:05.5
48 938 Tyler Jones University of Windsor Athletics Club 17 20:06.2
49 679 James Cromack SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 20:06.7
50 491 Brock Deba NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 16 20:06.8
51 538 Adrian Fournier OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 16 20:09.4
52 751 Peter Minbashian Toronto West Athletics 16 20:09.6
53 117 Cade Kochals Central Toronto Athletic Club 16 20:09.7
54 359 Joey Hardy LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 17 20:13.9
55 77 Ryan Were BURLINGTON TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 20:14.6
56 409 Bill Makwae Team Alberta 15 20:15.1
57 886 Matthew Exner Team SK 17 20:16
58 788 Alexander Royall Team Prairie 16 20:16.4
59 249 Vincent Tremblay Equipe Quebec 14 20:18.1
60 968 Tadzik Czubernat WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 20:18.4
61 206 Griffin Anderson GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15 20:19.1
62 482 Alex Sandras NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15 20:19.4
63 980 Greg McFarlane WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:21.2
64 126 Liam Rivard Central Toronto Athletic Club 15 20:22
65 505 Santiago Gaitan NIAGARA REGIONAL ATHLETICS 15 20:23.6
66 560 Levi Moulton Team NL 16 20:23.8
67 836 Korbett Cator Unattached-Manitoba 15 20:24.4
68 569 Aidan Goslett PHOENIX ATHLETICS ASSOC. OF ONTARIO 14 20:24.5
69 305 Foster Malleck LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 20:24.5
70 729 Rohan Nowbotsing TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 15 20:26.1
71 365 William Stewart LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 16 20:26.6
72 123 Connor Pribaz Central Toronto Athletic Club 14 20:26.8
73 936 Josh Galasso University of Windsor Athletics Club 17 20:28.1
74 294 Greg Carette LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:29.1
75 310 Brandon Sellers LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 20:29.4
76 692 Luke Mawhinney SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:31.2
77 704 Tyler Young SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:31.3
78 335 Julien Perreault-Roberge Equipe Quebec 17 20:33.3
79 745 John Duffy Toronto West Athletics 17 20:33.4
80 119 Mathew Lampard Central Toronto Athletic Club 14 20:33.7
81 857 Cailan Loebel Unattached-Manitoba 15 20:34.7
82 920 Mitchell Miron UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 17 20:34.8
83 239 Cameron Bates HERSHEY HARRIERS ATHLETIC CLUB 16 20:35.9
84 271 Carter Free Kingston Track & Field Club 16 20:36
85 49 Jack Amos ATHLETICS YUKON 15 20:36.7
86 779 Matthew Forman Team Prairie 16 20:36.8
87 159 Nicolas Riopel Corsaire-Chaparal 17 20:37.5
88 785 David McNish Team Prairie 17 20:38.7
89 534 Joe Fast OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 14 20:40
90 142 Atsushi Satomura Equipe Quebec 17 20:41.2
91 899 Joel Duff UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15 20:41.5
92 380 Drew Horner LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 17 20:42.7
93 274 Nathaniel St. Romain Kingston Track & Field Club 17 20:43.4
94 918 William McCreadie UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 17 20:43.6
95 448 Liam Crocket NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 17 20:43.8
96 580 Miles Brakenbury PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15 20:44.2
97 145 Liam Foster Team BC 17 20:44.4
98 442 Joshua Thomas Boston NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 14 20:44.5
99 976 Seth Kwasnicki WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 14 20:44.6
100 572 Liam McKelvey PHOENIX ATHLETICS ASSOC. OF ONTARIO 13 20:44.6
101 464 Aidan Jean NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15 20:45.1
102 54 Jackson Bernard Blue Devils Athletics Club 16 20:45.6
103 308 Mitchell Mowbray LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:45.9
104 599 Jack Rowlatt PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 16 20:45.9
105 169 Christopher Brisimitzis DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 16 20:46.1
106 678 Jason Cousineau SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 20:46.3
107 625 Zachary Lachance Rive-Sud 16 20:46.7
108 568 Matthew Cheung PHOENIX ATHLETICS ASSOC. OF ONTARIO 16 20:46.9
109 154 Jrmie Lpine Equipe Quebec 16 20:47.2
110 334 Felix Lafortune-Cazale Les Vainqueurs 17 20:47.5
111 812 Logan MacDonald UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA 15 20:51.8
112 970 Jan Fiedler WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:51.9
113 632 Nikita Zhuravkov Rive-Sud 15 20:53.3
114 695 Liam Ogilvie SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 20:54.2
115 125 Mark Richardson Central Toronto Athletic Club 15 20:56.4
116 744 Nicholas Carbone Toronto West Athletics 17 20:57.4
117 339 Lo Wormser Equipe Quebec 17 20:58
118 531 William Cox OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 15 21:00.3
119 343 Eric Gareau LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 17 21:01.3
120 318 Andrew Bryanton LES COUREURS DE BOIS 16 21:01.4
121 321 Benjamin Lee LES COUREURS DE BOIS 16 21:02
122 622 William Davalan Rive-Sud 15 21:02.2
123 76 Quinn Halldorson Team Alberta 17 21:04.2
124 327 Adam Saal LES COUREURS DE BOIS 16 21:05.4
125 861 Ryan Mutuchky Unattached-Manitoba 16 21:07.3
126 161 Brandon Adams DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 15 21:07.3
127 757 Daniel Rosen Toronto West Athletics 15 21:07.8
128 988 Noah Hoffman Team Prairie 17 21:07.9
129 199 Jacob Smith EXCEL ATHLETIKA 17 21:08
130 193 Alexandre Huot Dynamique de Laval 16 21:08.5
131 324 Charles Osborne LES COUREURS DE BOIS 16 21:09
132 862 Erik Ohrling Unattached-Manitoba 16 21:09.6
133 748 Austin Kpiebewieng Toronto West Athletics 17 21:10.8
134 978 Brandon Marusic WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 21:10.8
135 749 Justin Kpiebewieng Toronto West Athletics 17 21:10.9
136 273 Chet Moran Kingston Track & Field Club 15 21:11.6
137 586 Noah Frymire PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 16 21:12.1
138 739 Jesse Watt TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 15 21:12.5
139 432 Cameron Heinz Muskoka Algonquin Runners 14 21:13.3
140 342 Brady Esler LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 17 21:15
141 937 David Henderson University of Windsor Athletics Club 15 21:16.8
142 559 Evan Knight Team NL 15 21:17.2
143 939 Logan Provost University of Windsor Athletics Club 14 21:17.9
144 461 Maurice Graenert NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15 21:18.5
145 713 Hassan Ali TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 16 21:19.1
146 573 Rocharn Wilson PHOENIX ATHLETICS ASSOC. OF ONTARIO 15 21:20
147 972 Nicholas Forbes WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 21:21.5
148 488 Ryan Vincent NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15 21:21.7
149 175 Patrick Dean DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 14 21:22
150 460 Justin Graenert NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 17 21:24.2
151 764 Arthur Thebaud Track East 16 21:24.7
152 164 Connor Black DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 16 21:25.4
153 614 Dylan Bauman Team SK 15 21:25.6
154 746 Samer El-Galmady Toronto West Athletics 16 21:25.8
155 109 Cameron Denys Central Toronto Athletic Club 14 21:26.5
156 539 Spencer Giddings OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 16 21:27.2
157 964 Kiniw Cleland WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 21:28.4
158 532 Ryan Cunningham OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 15 21:28.5
159 934 Nathan Drouillard University of Windsor Athletics Club 17 21:30.3
160 404 Owen Guenette MAC TRACK 16 21:31
161 510 Keon Wallingford NORTH BAY LEGION 15 21:32.2
162 506 Logan Martineau NIAGARA REGIONAL ATHLETICS 17 21:33.4
163 603 Konnor Weston PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 16 21:34
164 959 Holden Burdett WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 21:34.3
165 810 Tate Haugan UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA 16 21:34.4
166 200 Michael Thiel Team SK 17 21:35.4
167 493 Derian Free NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 15 21:38.4
168 627 Christophe Quesnel Rive-Sud 15 21:44
169 219 Matthew Penner GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15 21:47.3
170 51 Joe Parker ATHLETICS YUKON 17 21:47.6
171 754 Thomas Perry Toronto West Athletics 16 21:47.9
172 985 Tyler Tofflemire WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16 21:51.2
173 820 Matthew Jones Team NL 17 21:51.4
174 364 Zach Staffell LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 17 21:53.7
175 774 Thomas Armstrong U OF C ATHLETICS CLUB 15 21:53.8
176 58 Aiden Mallany-Stanley Blue Devils Athletics Club 17 21:54
177 511 Thomas Grabher OCEANSIDE TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17 21:57.6
178 361 Stephen Robinson LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 16 22:00.2
179 408 Louis Labrie MAC TRACK 16 22:03.2
180 160 Marc Sfeir Corsaire-Chaparal 17 22:04.8
181 269 Campbell Fair Kingston Track & Field Club 16 22:05.3
182 933 Nicholas Cull University of Windsor Athletics Club 17 22:05.4
183 162 Josh Balk DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 14 22:07.2
184 663 Didier De Lange Sherbrooke 17 22:07.3
185 340 Jack Adams LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 16 22:10.9
186 743 Stephen Barber Toronto West Athletics 15 22:17.7
187 619 Justin Blashill Rive-Sud 15 22:20.1
188 60 Tristin Rowe Blue Devils Athletics Club 15 22:20.5
189 558 Eric Knight Team NL 15 22:23.5
190 507 Daniel O'Rourke NIAGARA REGIONAL ATHLETICS 17 22:33.3
191 391 Tyrone Traher LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 16 22:33.7
192 217 Tyler Middleton GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15 22:34.3
193 595 Liam McIlroy PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15 22:35.9
194 122 Joe Mark Central Toronto Athletic Club 17 22:36.6
195 492 Ivan Fernandez NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 15 22:37.9
196 476 Ahad Naim NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 17 22:53.9
197 958 Michael Brown WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 22:59.1
198 471 Ryan McIntosh NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15 23:01.4
199 71 Cole Lidlow BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 14 23:07.5
200 649 Alexander Pittman Team NL 16 23:18.5
201 499 Caleb Lavoie NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 16 23:29.7
202 602 Sebastian Valencia PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15 23:33.1
203 709 Jake Smith SS ATHLETICS 17 23:35.5
204 501 Chase Lupton NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 15 23:46.3
205 275 Aidan Tulk Kingston Track & Field Club 13 23:48.8
206 708 Christian Simmons SS ATHLETICS 14 23:52.5
207 322 Keegan Lockley LES COUREURS DE BOIS 14 24:05
208 272 Rory McGarvey Kingston Track & Field Club 14 24:15.7
209 581 Cam Bruce PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15 24:28.1
210 612 Jackson Bonn QUINTE LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15 24:32.7
211 433 Jakob Heinz Muskoka Algonquin Runners 16 25:10

Youth Women's 4km

Place Bib Name Team Name Chip
Time
Pace Age
1 100 Savanna Jordan Team Alberta 13:58.8 3:29 17
2 111 Aleksa Gold Team Ontario 14:01.9 3:31 16
3 514 Taryn O'Neill Team BC 14:03 3:31 16
4 477 Cameron Ormond Team Ontario 14:07.2 3:32 15
5 131 Alexandra Weir Team Ontario 14:13.4 3:33 14
6 222 Lilly Tuck Team Ontario 14:23.5 3:36 14
7 633 Grace Fetherstonhaugh Team BC 14:27 3:37 16
8 106 Remy Cattell Team Ontario 14:27.3 3:37 14
9 190 Solstice Saliba Team Ontario 14:30.4 3:37 16
10 973 Maya Hannagan WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 14:31 3:37 16
11 99 Emma Hubbard Team Alberta 14:34.4 3:39 17
12 427 Jessica Kellar MISSISSAUGA T.F.C. 14:34.7 3:39 16
13 654 Marie-Lyssa Lafontaine Equipe Quebec 14:36.8 3:39 17
14 182 Kansas MacKay DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 14:42.5 3:41 16
15 816 Olivia Willett Team BC 14:45.3 3:41 17
16 887 Kaila Neigum UNATTACHED-SASKATCHEWAN 14:47.2 3:42 17
17 987 Chloe Walker WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 14:50.3 3:42 16
18 960 Madison Burnham WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 14:51.1 3:43 17
19 344 Laura Parkinson LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 14:51.5 3:43 17
20 388 Martina Tait LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 14:52.2 3:43 17
21 132 Aly White Central Toronto Athletic Club 14:52.7 3:43 16
22 373 Zoe Burke LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 14:53.7 3:44 16
23 247 Anne-Frdrik Drolet Equipe Quebec 14:55.2 3:44 16
24 971 Caroline Forbes WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 14:55.8 3:44 16
25 168 Renelle Briggs DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 14:56.5 3:44 15
26 108 Kate Denomme Central Toronto Athletic Club 14:57.7 3:44 15
27 341 Victoria Bouck LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 14:58.6 3:45 15
28 868 Teagan Shapansky Unattached-Manitoba 14:59.6 3:45 15
29 759 Madeline Smart-Reed Toronto West Athletics 14:59.9 3:45 16
30 112 Emma Graham Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:00.9 3:45 14
31 346 Mikenna Vanderheyden LONDON LEGION TRACK & FIELD ALLIANCE 15:02.9 3:46 16
32 906 Sydney Grier UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:03.1 3:46 17
33 329 Sophie Warren LES COUREURS DE BOIS 15:04.2 3:46 16
34 967 Megan Coutinho WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15:07.4 3:47 15
35 990 Kelsey Haczkewicz YORKTON LEGION TRACK 15:07.8 3:47 17
36 902 Samantha Ford UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:09.4 3:47 15
37 438 Madison Heisterman Team BC 15:09.7 3:47 16
38 718 Pascale Gendron TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 15:09.7 3:47 16
39 192 Sarah Turner DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 15:09.9 3:47 16
40 296 Juliette Davies LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15:10 3:47 16
41 220 Hannah Russell GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15:10.4 3:47 16
42 72 Lily Meek BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 15:10.8 3:47 16
43 661 Anna Burnotte Equipe Quebec 15:11 3:48 16
44 791 Jovana Tepavac Team Alberta 15:11.4 3:48 17
45 411 Emma Steele Team Alberta 15:12.6 3:48 16
46 212 Hannah Goodjohn GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15:13 3:48 15
47 118 Jardine Lam-Colling Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:13.1 3:48 14
48 440 Eliza Jane Boston NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15:13.4 3:48 14
49 750 Mikaela Lucki Toronto West Athletics 15:14 3:49 17
50 412 Daniella Wasielewski Team Alberta 15:14.6 3:49 17
51 630 Marick Thibault Equipe Quebec 15:16.2 3:49 15
52 410 Paige Patterson Team Alberta 15:16.2 3:49 15
53 115 Parker Hopkins Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:17 3:49 15
54 786 Sophia Nowicki Team Prairie 15:17.3 3:49 17
55 98 Shaniah Hogman Team Prairie 15:17.5 3:49 16
56 405 Felicity Hik Team Prairie 15:18.2 3:49 17
57 484 Alison Schouten NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15:18.8 3:50 15
58 483 Nicole Sartor NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15:19.5 3:50 17
59 740 Anastasia Alexeeff Toronto West Athletics 15:20.7 3:50 17
60 300 Emily Huras LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15:21.6 3:51 16
61 548 Katie Newlove OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 15:23.7 3:51 14
62 623 Marie-Ange Hbert Rive-Sud 15:24.4 3:51 14
63 915 Beatrix Maddocks UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:24.4 3:51 15
64 753 Robyn Perry Toronto West Athletics 15:24.9 3:51 13
65 146 Georgia Ginther Team BC 15:26.5 3:52 17
66 116 Emma Kerr Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:26.9 3:52 16
67 402 Abby Ackerman MAC TRACK 15:27.2 3:52 17
68 224 Denbeigh Whitmarsh GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15:27.3 3:52 17
69 127 Ireland Robertson Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:27.9 3:52 15
70 179 Hannah Frazer DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 15:28.1 3:52 16
71 605 Anna Workman PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15:28.4 3:52 14
72 165 Jasmina Brar DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 15:29.3 3:52 15
73 441 Emily-Rose Boston NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15:30.7 3:52 16
74 553 Mollie Soroczan-Wright OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 15:31.5 3:53 16
75 113 Lauren Hart Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:33 3:53 14
76 926 Kaylen Soriano UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:33.6 3:54 15
77 992 Marianne Houle Equipe Quebec 15:33.7 3:54 17
78 723 Paige Kobe TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 15:34.5 3:54 17
79 96 Corrina Fowlow Team Prairie 15:35.5 3:54 17
80 897 Joana Ceddia UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:35.5 3:54 15
81 336 Simone Plourde Les Vainqueurs 15:35.6 3:54 16
82 105 Annie Ballantyne Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:35.7 3:54 14
83 977 Nicole Larue WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15:36.8 3:54 15
84 467 Sarah Kromberg NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15:37.2 3:54 17
85 931 Jessica Yi UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:37.9 3:54 17
86 924 Ava Rodrigues UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO T.C 15:39 3:55 16
87 951 Annika Austin VANCOUVER THUNDERBIRDS 15:39.5 3:55 16
88 59 Sarah Nolan Blue Devils Athletics Club 15:39.6 3:55 16
89 240 Marley Beckett HERSHEY HARRIERS ATHLETIC CLUB 15:40.4 3:55 17
90 755 Laura Peters Toronto West Athletics 15:41.3 3:56 14
91 773 Renee Andres U OF C ATHLETICS CLUB 15:42.5 3:56 16
92 187 Shania Rodrigues DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 15:42.7 3:56 16
93 611 Justine Stecko Team BC 15:43.5 3:56 16
94 472 Madison Mitten NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 15:43.6 3:56 16
95 821 Alison Leroux UNATTACHED NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR 15:44.5 3:56 14
96 216 Amanda Lewis GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15:45.2 3:56 14
97 197 Laurie Custeau Equipe Quebec 15:47.6 3:57 17
98 246 Tori Fitzpatrick ISLANDERS TRACK AND FIELD 15:47.8 3:57 17
99 494 Avery Goertz NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 15:47.9 3:57 17
100 590 Brooke Lappierre PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15:48.4 3:57 16
101 882 Corrin Kuzemchuk Team Prairie 15:49.3 3:57 16
102 667 Amlie Provencher Sherbrooke 15:50.1 3:57 16
103 42 Emma Everett 310 RUNNING 15:50.7 3:58 14
104 873 Paige Tullio Unattached-Manitoba 15:50.9 3:58 17
105 214 Claire Hales GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 15:51.9 3:58 15
106 577 Hana Amari PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 15:52.4 3:58 15
107 306 Mackenzie Morgan LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15:52.8 3:58 16
108 121 Kasha Mansour Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:53.4 3:59 17
109 57 Sam MacDonald Blue Devils Athletics Club 15:53.6 3:59 15
110 268 Lily Chubaty Kingston Track & Field Club 15:54.1 3:59 14
111 120 Zoe Lexovsky Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:54.9 3:59 15
112 629 Audrey Thberge Rive-Sud 15:55.3 3:59 15
113 763 Katherine Sheridan Track East 15:55.9 3:59 16
114 128 Rebecca Snow Central Toronto Athletic Club 15:56.9 3:59 14
115 965 Lynnsey Copat WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 15:57.8 3:59 16
116 70 Lexi Kundlacz BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 15:58.1 3:59 15
117 326 Eily Rauliuk-Dunn LES COUREURS DE BOIS 15:58.6 4:00 15
118 163 Taylor Beam DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 15:59.4 4:00 16
119 307 Tegan Morrison LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16:01.3 4:00 14
120 481 Cassidy Phillips NEWMARKET HUSKIES TRACK CLUB 16:01.4 4:00 15
121 88 Alyssia Mino-Roy C. A. Université Laval 16:01.6 4:00 16
122 621 Alexandrine Coursol Rive-Sud 16:02.5 4:00 15
123 186 Kendra Orr DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 16:02.6 4:00 16
124 983 Chloe Pugh WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16:02.6 4:00 15
125 74 Corinne Schonewille BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 16:03.3 4:01 17
126 266 Nora Bright Kingston Track & Field Club 16:04.5 4:01 16
127 686 Hope Harnack SPEED RIVER TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16:07.1 4:02 16
128 157 Mariane Gagnon Corsaire-Chaparal 16:07.4 4:02 16
129 331 Justine Desforges-Crpeau Les Vainqueurs 16:08.7 4:02 16
130 617 Mette Siemens RIVERSDALE ATHLETICS TRACK 16:09.5 4:02 15
131 533 Claire Cushing OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. 16:10 4:02 14
132 158 Mariane Pominville Corsaire-Chaparal 16:11.4 4:03 17
133 732 Olivia Roussel TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 16:14 4:04 15
134 793 Darienne Wourms U OF C ATHLETICS CLUB 16:14.5 4:04 15
135 775 Peri Bentley U OF C ATHLETICS CLUB 16:16.1 4:04 16
136 223 Carolyn Valleau GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 16:16.2 4:04 17
137 184 Julia Martin DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS 16:16.2 4:04 16
138 706 Dakota Poulter SS ATHLETICS 16:16.5 4:04 13
139 575 Alyshia Alkerton PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 16:19.4 4:05 13
140 737 Georgia Waller TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 16:19.5 4:05 16
141 756 Patricia Rasowski Toronto West Athletics 16:20 4:05 15
142 73 Madelynn Meek BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 16:20.7 4:05 17
143 574 Bella Adam PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON 16:24.6 4:06 17
144 758 Hannah Shouldice Toronto West Athletics 16:27.1 4:07 14
145 620 Camille Bourdeau-Marcil Rive-Sud 16:29.2 4:07 16
146 675 Camryn Williams SOUTH SIMCOE DUFFERIN T.F.C 16:30.8 4:08 16
147 766 Annika Wong Track East 16:31.9 4:08 16
148 221 Hannah Serrao GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 16:34 4:09 16
149 313 Paige Sweeney LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB 16:34 4:09 15
150 44 Alexys Maurice 310 RUNNING 16:35.6 4:09 14
151 61 Megan Torrance Blue Devils Athletics Club 16:39.7 4:10 15
152 360 Nadine Osman LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB 16:39.8 4:10 16
153 213 Cassie Greer GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 16:39.8 4:10 14
154 626 Myriam Poirier Rive-Sud 16:40.2 4:10 17
155 210 Avery Evans GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 16:40.4 4:10 15
156 43 Ali Jordan 310 RUNNING 16:46.1 4:12 17
157 726 Rebecca Mesburis TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 16:47.4 4:12 16
158 495 Lexi Hale NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 16:48.2 4:12 15
159 720 Sophia Greene TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB 16:57 4:14 16
160 55 Abi Braybrook Blue Devils Athletics Club 16:57.5 4:14 15
161 566 Destiny Robitaille PETERBOROUGH LEGION TRACK CLUB 16:58.6 4:15 16
162 565 Erika Rankin PETERBOROUGH LEGION TRACK CLUB 16:58.7 4:15 16
163 215 Laura Ireland GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 16:59 4:15 17
164 502 Kayla McGowan NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 17:04.9 4:16 17
165 982 Ally Oulds WINDSOR LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17:14.5 4:18 17
166 41 Olivia Cadieux 310 RUNNING 17:21.7 4:20 14
167 338 Lonora Shaub Les Vainqueurs 17:24.7 4:21 16
168 883 Sarah Urquhart Team Prairie 17:28.8 4:22 15
169 390 Nicole Tamming LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 17:30.4 4:23 17
170 330 Kianna Yemen LES COUREURS DE BOIS 17:35.1 4:24 16
171 40 Charlotte Barber 310 RUNNING 17:35.8 4:24 14
172 387 Kyleigh Stubbs LONDON WESTERN T.F.C. 17:41 4:25 16
173 613 Riley Donia QUINTE LEGION TRACK & FIELD CLUB 17:45.9 4:27 15
174 496 Tori Hendriks NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 17:53.8 4:28 16
175 498 Taylor Huff NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 17:56.3 4:29 15
176 504 Megan Norton NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 17:58.7 4:30 17
177 75 Marieke Van Spriel BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 17:59 4:30 15
178 503 Madalyn Noonan NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 17:59.4 4:30 14
179 218 Maya Parkin GREATER UXBRIDGE ROAD RUNNERS 18:25.4 4:37 14
180 707 Heather Sheldon SS ATHLETICS 18:26.6 4:37 15
181 760 Jennifer Ladanowski Track East 18:34.1 4:38 17
182 203 Sandrine Fragasso Fleur de Lys 18:41.9 4:40 17
183 68 Keira Cameron BROCKVILLE LEGION TRACK CLUB 18:53.5 4:43 15
184 497 Hannah Hesch NIAGARA OLYMPIC CLUB 18:56.8 4:44 16
185 536 Lia Ferguson Ottawa Lions M50 19:24.4 4:51 14
186 323 Alyssa Morris LES COUREURS DE BOIS 21:42.8 5:26 16

Masters 8km

Place Bib Name Team Name Gender Age Time Age
Percentage
1 817 Jeremiah Ziak Team BC Masters M 40 25:47.2 85.8
2 804 Graham Cocksedge Team BC Masters M 43 26:06.4 86.7
3 859 Predrag Mladenovic Unattached-Manitoba M 44 26:53.9 84.8
4 283 Brian Torrance LAKEHEAD RUNNING M 40 27:06.2 81.7
5 463 Derek Hackshaw Newmarket M40 B M 47 27:26.4 85.2
6 610 Craig Odermatt Team BC Masters M 46 27:35.5 84.0
7 486 Dave Tepper Newmarket M40 B M 41 27:44.3 80.4
8 85 Claude Gilbert C. A. Université Laval M 46 27:52.6 83.2
9 309 Jim Seeds LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB M 47 27:57.8 83.6
10 480 Geoff Peat Newmarket M50 M 53 28:00.7 87.6
11 994 Kevin Beatty ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS M 40 28:08.6 78.6
12 769 Pascal Renard TRACK NORTH ATHLETIC CLUB M 41 28:13.1 79.0
13 431 Troy Cox Muskoka Algonquin M40 M 49 28:21.3 83.7
14 813 Chris Napier UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA M 38 28:28.3 76.6
15 302 Jamie Labrosse LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB M 44 28:34.3 79.9
16 263 Samuel Tousignant Kelenjins M35 M 37 28:35.5 75.8
17 147 Tyler Ginther Team BC Masters M 50 28:38.3 83.6
18 414 Alistair Munro OMBP M50 M 50 28:40.5 83.5
19 642 Matthew Norminton RUNNING ROOM ATHLETIC CLUB ALBERTA M 39 28:43.6 76.5
20 429 Jeramie Carbonaro Muskoka Algonquin M40 M 42 28:43.8 78.2
21 856 Andrew Lockwood Unattached-Manitoba M 36 28:59.1 74.4
22 530 Richard Charette Ottawa Lions M40 M 49 28:59.9 81.8
23 454 Daniel Fiorini Newmarket M40 B M 54 29:00.2 85.3
24 515 Nick Cosman ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS M 35 29:01.7 74.0
25 259 Robin Richard-Campeau Kelenjins M35 M 37 29:01.7 74.7
26 831 Michael Bianchi Unattached-Manitoba M 37 29:04.3 74.6
27 314 Michael Tickner LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB M 43 29:04.3 77.9
28 829 Ross Bain Unattached-Manitoba M 36 29:07.9 74.0
29 353 Andrew Jones LONDON PACERS M 50 29:08.6 82.1
30 871 Matthew Stanley Unattached-Manitoba M 41 29:12.5 76.3
31 422 John Lofranco McGill Olympic Club M 39 29:16.9 75.0
32 449 Chris Deighan Newmarket M50 M 56 29:19.3 85.8
33 846 Tim Gillespie Iron Stride M35 M 39 29:32.8 74.3
34 436 Mark Sinnige Muskoka Algonquin M40 M 47 29:33.5 79.1
35 860 David Moore Unattached-Manitoba M 48 29:34.4 79.6
36 711 Travis Cummings St. Timonthy's Thunder Jr/Sr High School M 31 29:45 71.4
37 46 Sofiane Tayane A.T.P athlétisme M 37 29:47.5 72.8
38 281 Kip Sigsworth LAKEHEAD RUNNING M 42 29:52.9 75.2
39 551 Kevin Shields Ottawa Lions M40 M 50 29:53.1 80.1
40 807 John Grabher UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA M 49 29:55.7 79.3
41 244 Savvas Frantzeskos Iron Stride M35 M 42 30:05.4 74.7
42 139 Marc Molgat Cirrus de l'Outaouais M 49 30:05.7 78.9
43 366 Jeremy Walsh LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB M 41 30:07.8 74.0
44 137 Dave McMahon Cirrus de l'Outaouais M 52 30:08.9 80.7
45 634 John Blankenship Running Room Alberta M 50 30:10.7 79.3
46 923 Simon Rayner UTTC M50 M 52 30:12.6 80.5
47 424 Jean-Luc Mejane McGill Olympic Club M 45 30:17 75.9
48 838 Sheldon Cooper Unattached-Manitoba M 35 30:18.3 70.8
49 457 Vince Friel Newmarket M50 M 53 30:18.7 80.9
50 277 Jonathan MacGavock LAKEHEAD RUNNING M 41 30:20.8 73.5
51 589 Jeffery Lapierre PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON M 44 30:20.8 75.2
52 925 Michael Sherar UTTC M50 M 53 30:23.4 80.7
53 356 Benjamin Burr LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB M 32 30:24.3 69.9
54 837 Joel Clarke-Ames Unattached-Manitoba M 35 30:30 70.4
55 828 Daniel Bach Unattached-Manitoba M 31 30:34.6 69.4
56 242 Kevin Kornelsen Indépendant M 54 30:35.3 80.9
57 443 Steve Boston Newmarket M 40 B M 46 30:35.8 75.8
58 527 Corey Turnbull ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS M 45 30:42.8 74.9
59 261 Genevieve Shurtleff Kelenjins M35 F 39 30:54.8 79.5
60 252 Michael Blois K2J Fitness M 45 30:58.4 74.3
61 579 Steven Blostein PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON M 55 31:00.1 80.5
62 844 Paul Felix Unattached-Manitoba M 41 31:02.9 71.8
63 253 Jim Fullarton K2J Fitness M 51 31:03.2 77.7
64 809 Nicki Haugan UNATTACHED BRITISH COLUMBIA F 39 31:03.5 79.2
65 542 Dave Kary Ottawa Lions M40 M 57 31:06.8 81.6
66 135 Jean-Francois Fillion Cirrus de l'Outaouais M 56 31:10.9 80.7
67 47 Hassan Zaghry A.T.P athlétisme M 47 31:16.2 74.7
68 544 Liz Maguire Ottawa Lions M50 F 50 31:20.9 86.3
69 914 Anthony MacIsaac UTTC M50 M 52 31:23.7 77.5
70 415 Seanna Robinson OMBP W40 F 41 31:24.9 79.2
71 295 Jonathan Cressman LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB M 45 31:30.1 73.0
72 841 Michael Day Ottawa Lions M50 M 53 31:31.8 77.8
73 525 Donna Mae Robins ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS F 40 31:34.8 78.3
74 418 Malcolm Balk McGill Olympic Club M 62 31:37.8 83.9
75 173 Bill Cunliffe DURHAM DRAGONS ATHLETICS M 57 31:39.1 80.2
76 437 Mary Unsworth Muskoka Algonquin W35 F 38 31:44.8 77.1
77 400 Gerardo Reyes Longboat M40 M 41 31:46 70.2
78 516 Trevor Davies Iron Stride M35 M 43 31:48.8 71.1
79 413 Andy Blackwell OMBP M50 M 51 31:52.3 75.7
80 523 Scott Pegrum Ottawa Lions M50 M 50 31:53.2 75.1
81 855 Blair Layng Unattached-Manitoba M 52 32:00.4 76.0
82 434 Tony Marra Muskoka Algonquin M40 M 48 32:03.9 73.4
83 358 Brian Hagemeier LONDON RUNNER DISTANCE CLUB M 46 32:04.1 72.3
84 392 Michelle Clarke Longboat Roadrunners F 42 32:05.9 78.0
85 473 Elaine Mota Newmarket W35 F 51 32:16.2 84.9
86 853 Bill Krezonoski Unattached-Manitoba M 63 32:19.7 82.8
87 462 Mirco Graenert Newmarket M 40 B M 47 32:27.5 72.0
88 245 Michael MacDonald Iron Stride M 33 32:27.7 65.7
89 644 Michael Secker Running Room Alberta M 65 32:28.8 83.9
90 519 Bryan Lambert ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS M 45 32:34.7 70.6
91 547 Robert Muir Ottawa Lions M40 M 48 32:39.7 72.1
92 445 Carrie Byer Newmarket W35 F 37 32:43.9 74.4
93 110 John Ellis Central Toronto Athletic Club M 51 32:48.6 73.6
94 355 Jeff Orchard LONDON PACERS M 51 32:49.6 73.5
95 765 Bernard Thebaud Track East M 51 33:09.8 72.8
96 863 Heather Ostic Unattached-Manitoba F 48 33:12.7 79.7
97 439 Robert Blair Newmarket M 40 B M 52 33:18 73.1
98 733 Ian Sinclair TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB M 46 33:18.3 69.6
99 456 James Freemantle Newmarket M50 M 58 33:25.5 76.6
100 537 Michael Ferguson Ottawa Lions M50 M 52 33:33.7 72.5
101 875 Jim Van Buskirk Nomads M 60 33:35.8 77.6
102 596 Clive Morgan PHYSI-KULT KINGSTON M 57 33:48.7 75.1
103 901 Walter Faion UTTC M40 M 56 34:03.9 73.9
104 835 Paul Carter Nomads M 60 34:16.6 76.0
105 905 Peter Gordon UTTC M50 M 56 34:17 73.4
106 798 Bob Holmes Running Room Alberta M 62 34:28 77.0
107 416 Carrie Scace OMBP W40 F 47 34:36.1 75.6
108 396 Trevor Kobe Longboat M40 M 55 34:37.7 72.1
109 63 Brent Hutchinson BRANTFORD T.F.C. M 59 34:45.1 74.3
110 417 Leanne Shafir OMBP W40 F 47 34:51.1 75.1
111 201 Jack Cook Fast Trax Run & Ski Club M 49 35:10.3 67.5
112 397 Christine Loch Longboat W50 F 54 35:16.5 80.5
113 917 Michael Mandel UTTC M40 M 47 35:24.1 66.0
114 826 Jon Anderson Unattached-Manitoba M 49 35:29.5 66.9
115 830 Debbie Bell Nomads F 50 35:30.5 76.2
116 478 Ted Paget Newmarket M60 M 65 35:33.7 76.7
117 52 Don White ATHLETICS YUKON M 66 35:39.6 77.2
118 874 Wendy J Turner Unattached-Manitoba F 49 35:44.7 74.9
119 880 Cora Yin Unattached-Manitoba F 41 35:48.7 69.5
120 827 Joanne Armstrong Unattached-Manitoba F 51 36:11.7 75.7
121 399 Jim Rawling Longboat M40 M 61 36:13.5 72.6
122 878 Boyd Whyte Unattached-Manitoba M 61 36:13.9 72.6
123 518 Dermot Holwell ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS M 62 36:15.3 73.2
124 535 Jean Ferguson OTTAWA LIONS T.F.C. F 52 36:17.5 76.4
125 522 Gord Nelson Nomads M 60 36:20.7 71.7
126 347 Robert Campbell LONDON PACERS M 57 36:24.1 69.7
127 508 Elaine Marchese Nomads F 52 36:25.3 76.1
128 949 Jill Delane VANCOUVER FALCONS ATHLETIC CLUB F 51 36:39.3 74.7
129 724 Brian Lovshin TORONTO OLYMPIC CLUB M 47 36:46.4 63.5
130 852 Greg King Unattached-Manitoba M 35 36:52.7 58.2
131 435 Jessica Sheppard Muskoka Algonquin Runners F 33 36:53.4 65.3
132 524 Annie Riel ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS F 42 36:57.4 67.8
133 528 Andrew Wilkes OMBP M50 M 63 37:05.1 72.2
134 138 Lise Meloche Cirrus de l'Outaouais F 56 37:05.2 78.4
135 143 Alana Bonner Club de coureurs Boréal F 36 37:08.6 65.4
136 251 Judy Andrew Piel K2J Fitness F 54 37:10 76.4
137 896 Rita Botelho UTTC W50 F 56 37:25.1 77.7
138 395 Wayne Ferron Longboat M40 M 49 37:33.4 63.2
139 916 Chris Madsen UTTC M40 M 48 37:34.5 62.7
140 430 Darla Coles Muskoka Algonquin W35 F 37 37:39.4 64.7
141 428 Sharon Bennett Muskoka Algonquin W35 F 38 37:45.6 64.8
142 910 Lynn Kobayashi UTTC W60 F 61 37:51.9 81.9
143 866 Keith Rodrigues Nomads M 63 38:28.1 69.6
144 459 Anke Graenert Newmarket W35 F 49 38:39.3 69.2
145 254 Nathalie Gauthier K2J Fitness F 51 38:40.5 70.8
146 843 Zarah Dehnashi Nomads F 50 39:14.2 69.0
147 301 Jon Krys LAUREL CREEK TRACK & FIELD CLUB M 45 39:14.8 58.6
148 257 Diane Pomerleau Kalenjins F 52 39:20.3 70.5
149 526 Christine Ross ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS F 52 39:26.9 70.3
150 393 Hugh Connolly Longboat M70 M 71 39:32.9 73.3
151 921 Clara Northcott UTTC W60 F 62 39:34.6 79.4
152 854 Corinne Krezonoski Unattached-Manitoba F 62 40:19.6 77.9
153 728 Glen Norcliffe Toronto Olympic M70 M 73 40:20 73.8
154 876 James Whipp Unattached-Manitoba M 64 40:25.1 66.8
155 401 Tony Teddy Longboat M70 M 70 40:48.8 70.2
156 927 Keijo Taivassalo UTTC M70 M 77 41:02 77.7
157 898 Vern Christensen UTTC M70 M 75 41:52.5 73.4
158 479 Tim Payne Newmarket M60 M 66 41:57.2 65.6
159 350 Robert Fraser LONDON PACERS M 62 42:11.6 62.9
160 727 Robert Moore Toronto Olympic M70 M 76 42:28.9 73.6
161 998 Liza Parry Longboat W50 F 50 42:44.5 63.3
162 394 Bert De Vries Longboat M70 M 70 42:49.2 66.9
163 348 Maureen Dow LONDON PACERS F 56 43:00.5 67.6
164 351 Wendy Fraser LONDON PACERS F 62 43:01.7 73.0
165 349 Chuck Edwards LONDON PACERS M 71 43:20.7 66.9
166 352 Kevin Garlick LONDON PACERS M 54 43:49.5 56.4
167 354 Eric Magni LONDON PACERS M 70 44:31 64.4
168 660 Gatan Breton Sherbrooke M 68 44:34.4 62.9
169 398 Claire Prest Longboat W50 F 72 46:48.7 77.5
170 520 P. J. Marshall ONTARIO MASTERS ATHLETICS M 74 51:09.7 59.1
171 466 Nancy Konyu Newmarket M60 F 61 51:57.9 59.7
172 879 Bob Wild Unattached-Manitoba M 84 1:00:40.1 62.6
173 847 Michael Goodstadt Unattached-Manitoba M 76 1:01:13.8 51.1

Community  5km

Place Bib Name Gender City Chip
Time
Pace Age Division
Place
Division
1 1133 Garrett De Jong M   16:34.5 3:19 27 1 M 20-29
2 1204 Marcus Nobel M   16:40.7 3:20 21 2 M 20-29
3 1217 Derek Van Schepen M Mississauga 16:43 3:21 22 3 M 20-29
4 1152 Tom Glassco M   17:08.3 3:26 28 4 M 20-29
5 1209 Hugh Langley M   17:15.1 3:27 31 1 M 30-39
6 1218 Romain Aymon M   18:06.6 3:37 21 5 M 20-29
7 1183 Jrmy Schneider M   18:18.1 3:39 20 6 M 20-29
8 1190 Nathan Eastmond M   18:30.5 3:42 14 1 M 0-19
9 1198 Mike MacKett M St. Catharines 18:31.9 3:42 25 7 M 20-29
10 1194 Braydon Trowbrdge M   18:34.6 3:43 14 2 M 0-19
11 1127 Julien Guyon M   18:39.4 3:44 18 3 M 0-19
12 1103 Aysia Maurice F   18:48.1 3:46 12 1 F 0-19
13 1102 Sean Cromack M   18:48.4 3:46 13 4 M 0-19
14 1156 Avery Ling M Unattached 18:49 3:46 19 5 M 0-19
15 1200 Ryan Van Dyl M   18:55.8 3:47 26 8 M 20-29
16 1147 Adam Andrecyk M Kingston 19:09.2 3:50 34 2 M 30-39
17 1175 Pascal Dubreuil M   19:09.8 3:50 30 3 M 30-39
18 1184 Jessy Vallires M   19:17.4 3:52 22 9 M 20-29
19 1131 Christopher Storer M   19:18.1 3:52 16 6 M 0-19
20 1202 Jamie Barlow M Oakville 19:22.5 3:52 36 4 M 30-39
21 1199 Maxine Gravina F Hamilton 19:32.7 3:54 22 1 F 20-29
22 1158 Stuart Lupenette M Unattached 19:39.9 3:56 16 7 M 0-19
23 1136 Liam Cowan M Unattached 19:45.8 3:57 14 8 M 0-19
24 1134 Braeden Brown F   19:50.3 3:58 19 2 F 0-19
25 1169 Maggie Scheunert F   19:57.8 4:00 20 2 F 20-29
26 1188 Aidan Bridger M   20:02.5 4:00 13 9 M 0-19
27 1216 Molly Steer F   20:07 4:01 21 3 F 20-29
28 1146 Natasha Wong F   20:18.4 4:04 19 3 F 0-19
29 1111 Adrienne Morgan F   20:26.9 4:05 21 4 F 20-29
30 1137 Wayne Rice M   20:29.7 4:06 54 1 M 50-99
31 1159 Thomas Lupenette M   20:49.1 4:10 14 10 M 0-19
32 1138 Ryota Udo M   20:50.5 4:10 16 11 M 0-19
33 1179 Kesya Longval F   20:54.4 4:11 22 5 F 20-29
34 1157 Darryl Lupenette M Unattached 20:54.5 4:11 45 1 M 40-49
35 1170 Kiefer Uuksulainen M North Bay 21:09.7 4:14 23 10 M 20-29
36 1205 Aaron Bruyns M   21:17 4:15 28 11 M 20-29
37 1150 Anya De Beer F   21:17.7 4:15 19 4 F 0-19
38 1196 Devin Brown M   21:22.6 4:17 19 12 M 0-19
39 1155 Tyler Lavoie M   21:27.9 4:18 14 13 M 0-19
40 1193 Nolan McReelis M   21:36.8 4:19 10 14 M 0-19
41 1126 Martin Guyon M   21:40.1 4:20 50 2 M 50-99
42 1173 Anthony Denis M   21:55.2 4:23 18 15 M 0-19
43 1135 Connor Cowan M Unattached 21:58.8 4:23 12 16 M 0-19
44 1018 Richard Prinsen M   22:06.7 4:25   17 M 0-19
45 1149 Samantha Csisztu F   22:07.7 4:25 13 5 F 0-19
46 1129 Jake Knutsson M   22:07.8 4:25 14 18 M 0-19
47 1174 Jacob Desrosiers M   22:30.6 4:30 17 19 M 0-19
48 1161 Kurtis Marlow M   22:54.8 4:35 36 5 M 30-39
49 1153 Dave Kervin M   22:55.8 4:35 38 6 M 30-39
50 1124 Serge Nadeau M Kalenjins 23:49.6 4:46 53 3 M 50-99
51 1160 Andrew Lupenette M   24:00.9 4:48 11 20 M 0-19
52 1181 William Paul-Hus M   24:01.4 4:48 21 12 M 20-29
53 1195 Molly Patrick F Enss 24:22.5 4:53 15 6 F 0-19
54 1164 Arielle Morgan F   24:27.5 4:53 24 6 F 20-29
55 1142 Muriel Lovshin F Toronto Olympic Club 24:29.9 4:54 10 7 F 0-19
56 1101 Paige Barber F   24:33.5 4:55 11 8 F 0-19
57 1180 Ve Mathieu F   25:19.5 5:04 18 9 F 0-19
58 1148 Danielle Boyd F   25:19.5 5:04 26 7 F 20-29
59 1121 Elli Parsons F   25:29.5 5:06 13 10 F 0-19
60 1212 Kendra Noble F   25:32.8 5:06 42 1 F 40-49
61 1206 Matt Duphney M   25:32.9 5:06 40 2 M 40-49
62 1172 Nalanda Beaupr F   25:33.3 5:07 17 11 F 0-19
63 1167 Andrea Rochon F   25:34.5 5:07 32 1 F 30-39
64 1154 Casey Kidson F Unattached 25:34.8 5:07 28 8 F 20-29
65 1165 Shelby O'Ryan F   25:49.2 5:10 24 9 F 20-29
66 1207 Hillary Elrick F   25:57.4 5:11 20 10 F 20-29
67 1171 Julie Valente F   26:03.1 5:13 42 2 F 40-49
68 1210 Jean Leroux M   26:09.4 5:14 42 3 M 40-49
69 1162 Laura McDowell F   26:18.7 5:16 43 3 F 40-49
70 1114 Kylie Filion F   26:25.7 5:17 28 11 F 20-29
71 1132 Andrea Cherry F   26:34.1 5:19 43 4 F 40-49

Community 2.5km

Place Bib Name Gender City Chip
Time
Pace Age Division
Place
Division
1 1187 Kamran Brar M   9:27.9 3:47 11 1 M Open
2 1128 Lucas Olmstead M   9:50.4 3:56 13 2 M Open
3 1107 Catherine Turner F   10:20.3 4:08 12 1 F Open
4 1145 Molly Pert F   10:32.2 4:13 13 2 F Open
5 1104 Elias Coles M   10:53 4:21 13 3 M Open
6 1143 Riley Buckle F   10:53.5 4:22 13 3 F Open
7 1108 Elizabeth Turner F   10:54.6 4:22 10 1 F 10-19
8 1144 Emma Jarvis F Track East 11:01.9 4:25 13 2 F 10-19
9 1163 Reese McShane F   11:06.5 4:27 11 3 F 10-19
10 1109 Rachel Turner F   11:15.6 4:30 14 4 F 10-19
11 1215 Thomas Sinclair M   11:22.4 4:33 12 1 M 10-19
12 1017 Unknown Partic. 1017 M   11:23.5 4:33   1 M 0- 9
13 1125 Athena Andrecyk F   11:30.4 4:36 8 1 F 0- 9
14 1213 Will Noble Duphney M   11:38.4 4:40 11 2 M 10-19
15 1201 Sophie Saunders-Lambert F   11:46.2 4:43 10 5 F 10-19
16 1214 Hannah Noble Duphney F   12:02.5 4:49 9 2 F 0- 9
17 1106 Matt Coles M   12:38.8 5:03 35 1 M 30-39
18 1105 Sol Coles M   12:40.2 5:04 11 3 M 10-19
19 1141 Brianna Lovshin F Unattached 13:10.1 5:16 8 3 F 0- 9
20 1185 Samuel Cubitt M   13:13.3 5:18 8 2 M 0- 9
21 1208 Alayna Heinz F   13:18.1 5:19 9 4 F 0- 9
22 1019 Unknown Partic. 1019 M   13:19 5:19   3 M 0- 9
23 1186 Rosine Cubitt F   13:43.2 5:29 37 1 F 30-39
24 1182 Cassandra Pothier F   13:48.9 5:32 19 6 F 10-19
25 1120 Miya Ott F   18:21 7:21 10 7 F 10-19
26 1117 Alissa Leclair F   18:21.5 7:21 12 8 F 10-19
27 1118 Alexa MacHado Claro F   20:44.6 8:18 12 9 F 10-19
28 1123 Trinity Wheeler F   20:49.3 8:20 12 10 F 10-19
29 1192 Holly MacKay F Ajax 20:57.3 8:23 14 11 F 10-19
30 1191 Katherine Lucas F   21:29.2 8:36 15 12 F 10-19
31 1116 Shea-Lee Leclair F   24:27.8 9:47 10 13 F 10-19
32 1113 Kendrayah Ducharme F   26:26.3 10:34 11 14 F 10-19

User Comments

  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 49409
    thumbs_up 2
    Report    REPLY #1 

    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Where can I find Team results please?

    Quote comment
  • oddish User since:
    Feb 21st, 2013
    Posts: 34
    thumbs_up 1
    Report    REPLY #2 

    Oddish said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Where can I find Team results please?"


    http://speedrivertiming.com/

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 49409
    thumbs_up 4
    Report    REPLY #3 

    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Quick stats on Senior Men and Women - the Men appear to be younger than the women - and both younger than expected all round. Common wisdom says the distance runner starts hitting their prime age 26-34.

    Women:

    Mean
    25
    Median
    24
    Mode
    20

    Men

    Mean
    23.9
    Median
    23
    Mode
    23

    I thought the average age would be higher for both.

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 49409
    thumbs_up 5
    Report    REPLY #4 

    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Quick stats on Senior Men and Women - the Men appear to be younger than the women - and both younger than expected all round. Common wisdom says the distance runner starts hitting their prime age 26-34.

    Women:

    Mean
    25
    Median
    24
    Mode
    20

    Men

    Mean
    23.9
    Median
    23
    Mode
    23

    I thought the average age would be higher for both."



    Not arguing with your age for hitting prime however common wisdom also says that between 26-30 mom and dad kick you out of their basement so you have to start working more hours to pay your own rent and buy your own groceries, so perhaps adequate training and a trip to Uganda are not in the cards. Also between the ages 30-34 many people (men and women) have a baby so a trip to the grocery store can seem daunting yet alone a trip to Uganda. I know running is our life but I think real life can get in the way sometimes and that is why the average age is lower than you thought it might be. Thoughts anyone else?

    Quote comment
  • anonymous Anonymous
    Posts: 49409
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    Report    REPLY #5 

    Andrew Jones said 2 years ago

    "I thought the average age would be higher for both."
    ------------------------------

    Thanks for doing the math.

    Re. "hitting their prime", from talking to many distance runners and looking at their careers, the "adaptation period" of 10-12 years seems about right. In other words, after serious training is undertaken, the distance runner will run their PB(s) a decade or so down the road.

    In light of many endurance runners starting "real training" at 15 or 16, it seems most will peak at 25 to 27 years of age.

    This year's Canadian XC Champs age statistics are below that traditional wisdom, and one may hazard some guesses as to why:

    >AC XC being just two weeks after USports XC is attractive to the in-shape university crowd
    >many distance runners are eschewing XC now for the more celebrated and lucrative arena of marathon running
    >a national team spot was on offer this time around, and this may appeal more to those up-and-coming runners who've yet to "earn a cap" as a Canadian internationalist

    Quote comment
  • cowardnessthyname User since:
    Oct 11th, 2013
    Posts: 168
    thumbs_up 0
    Report    REPLY #6 

    Cowardnessthyname said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Quick stats on Senior Men and Women - the Men appear to be younger than the women - and both younger than expected all round. Common wisdom says the distance runner starts hitting their prime age 26-34.

    Women:

    Mean
    25
    Median
    24
    Mode
    20

    Men

    Mean
    23.9
    Median
    23
    Mode
    23

    I thought the average age would be higher for both."


    Stats aren't very useful without context. Why did you choose to calculate these numbers based on the entire field? If we're determining prime age for peaking, wouldn't it be more beneficial to calculate it based on who made the team for the world championships i.e top 6? What your data tells us the average person running senior XC skews younger, which may be partially the product of the fact that you can compete as a master after the age of 30.

    For the top 6:

    Women:
    Mean
    27.5
    Median
    27.5

    Men:
    Mean
    24
    Median
    24

    Men definitely still skew younger especially, but take out Coolsaet (running Fukuoka) and Genest (focusing on the roads?) who both ran last year and that is bound to happen.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Cowardnessthyname
    "Stats aren't very useful without context. Why did you choose to calculate these numbers based on the entire field? If we're determining prime age for peaking, wouldn't it be more beneficial to calculate it based on who made the team for the world championships i.e top 6? What your data tells us the average person running senior XC skews younger, which may be partially the product of the fact that you can compete as a master after the age of 30.

    For the top 6:

    Women:
    Mean
    27.5
    Median
    27.5

    Men:
    Mean
    24
    Median
    24

    Men definitely still skew younger especially, but take out Coolsaet (running Fukuoka) and Genest (focusing on the roads?) who both ran last year and that is bound to happen."


    Doing the math wasn't hard - the files copy and paste easily into Excel.

    I chose the whole field because I was curious about participation in the National Championships - I assumed that people would only participate if they thought they were elite enough to do so. I don't think it is fair to cherry pick out the top 6 in this case because it doesn't give a good representation of the "average" athlete who is competing on the day.

    I don't care about who didn't show up - precisely because they didn't show up.

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  • cummings User since:
    Apr 1st, 2006
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    Cummings said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Quick stats on Senior Men and Women - the Men appear to be younger than the women - and both younger than expected all round. Common wisdom says the distance runner starts hitting their prime age 26-34.

    Women:

    Mean
    25
    Median
    24
    Mode
    20

    Men

    Mean
    23.9
    Median
    23
    Mode
    23

    I thought the average age would be higher for both."

    Been a good while since I have posted on here; however this thread intrigued me so I figured I would chime in.

    I would argue that although theoretically the peak physiological age for distance running is 26-34, at least in North American society, and particularly in the sub-elite crowd (which is the majority of us), that age group is ripe for seeing a major lull in performance. I think for the most part, at least in my personal experience, I see more guys I have trained with (myself included), see major performance dips in the late 20's and early 30's only to have a resurgence starting mid-30's on.

    There are multiple reasons for this:

    1) Lots of guys (I am not necessarily discussing females here) hang on to their university glory for a year or two after they graduate to see where it takes them. More often than not they run pretty quickly but not fast enough to make a living off of it. They have fun for a time but realize, "SHIT, swift motion through space sure doesn't pay the bills". This generally puts them around 25-26 when they realize this, thus they get a job and have to make some major adjustments to their life circumstances, running takes the back burner as a result. Uni is fun and it is a hard thing to let go of.

    2) It's at this time that if you have been in the workforce, you tend to take more responsibility and establish yourself. This also means running is shelved for a time (or more often permanently). Time management is a real struggle throughout these years and it takes conscience effort to reorganize schedules and priorities to figure out how running will continue to be part of your lifestyle. You can't just skip class to get an extra couple hours of sleep if you want it.

    3) Related to #1 I guess (I know this is disjointed). Years of over-training and doing off-day runs too hard with the boys, coupled with boozy Saturday nights and then getting up for Sunday long runs in university starts to catch up big time in the late-twenties, early thirties, precisely at the same time career and family responsibilities become more important. This likely leads to burnout and injury that may last a few years, the body simply needs a break from the pounding of the last decade of high school and post-secondary competition; and burning the candle at both ends. Again, the runner must choose then if running is important enough to stick with, most choose it not to be.

    4) People start families, young families are a LOT of work, running isn't that important as a result.

    5) Master's running doesn't start until age 35, a lot of guys who are no longer good enough to compete with the top university and open athletes don't really have much to compete for until after they turn 35. Also, at this age, kids (if you have them) are generally older and more capable athletes, and you can do more things with them, introduce them to training. They are more self sufficient so you have more time to spend on yourself. By 35, people who have put the time in on their careers are pretty well established and you can often relax a little bit and still have a high level of competency. THIS IS WHY I THINK MASTER'S AGES SHOULD BE LOWERED TO AFTER 30, like XC skiing and swimming, pretty much no one in those sports competes after 30 and they need to keep people interested.

    There are probably more things I can add here, but you get the gist. Look at any road race or age group results, there are obvious exceptions; but often the 20-24 age categories and then the 35-39 age categories have proportionately better results than the 25-29 and 30-34 contingent (I am no exception, being 31, I'm in the midst of digging myself out of a multi-year malaise and general disinterest in being competitive in the sport due to all of the above things mentioned, minus the kid, however I coach a good chunk of them).

    So although the physiological prime may be in this 26-34 timeline, I think for a lot of people (mostly sub-elite, again, which is MOST OF US!), our actual prime circumstances for life happen later and as running is a but a microcosm of life, our race results reflect this reality.

    There are also many men who choose to have families later (post 35) but already have their career established, once they have children they already have the day to day sort of figured out. Having kids brings them great joy and stability, and they take being a role model pretty seriously. It's the motivation that lights the fire again for them, and you see older men running as fast as they were in university or their early twenties as a result.

    You have got to have something other than selfish goals to keep you training at a high level as you age, I think a lot of guys have a hard time figuring this out once they leave uni. Extrinsic motivation doesn't really work for older athletes.

    Come to think of it, I would say 50% of my peers or more in the Southern Alberta running scene have run lifetime PB's post 35. Most of them struggled or had other interests or responsibilities in late twenties, early thirties.

    Anyway, hope that sparks some conversation.

    This post was edited by Cummings 2 years ago . 
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  • benjaminburr User since:
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    benjaminburr said 2 years ago

    Great post, Travis.

    I'm in a similar boat. I had a great stretch of training in my mid-20s, because once I got out of school I was in a new city and didn't really have anything else to do, and it was a good way to be social. Eventually, I started running to and from work to get in mileage, and found it got in the way of my workouts but was good otherwise. Then in my late 20s I went back to school and kept doing the run-commute thing. I was getting in 10-12km each way at the peak of it. It was a lot of fun and I would (and will) do it again.

    Then I switched schools and cities, and that's been a tough transition. The run-commute didn't really work as well here. And as school got harder, running had to be put on the back burner because I'm doing this to change careers and doing well in school has got to be my top priority. I was never going to be more than a mid-pack runner. But now that I'm settled in again, I'm starting to get back into it and it will come along.

    I was grateful sub-masters have the opportunity to run in the masters race at nationals. Someone at my level is going to be dead last by a couple of minutes in the senior men's race at nationals. Last time I ran it, I was in the best shape of my life and ended up beating two guys, and ran almost the entire thing solo. There just aren't any bodies to fill the gaps. The masters race was fantastic, because I was never by myself. Even if I had been in the shape I was in three years ago, I would still have been maybe 10th to 15th. The only XC race outside of college/university I've had an actual field to race against in the last 6 years was the Guelph race. I doubt it's much of a draw for runners like me who stick with it but aren't that fast to sign up to run 10km by yourself. Or if you're out of shape, it's probably the same thing. I don't really mind it too much, but it's definitely preferable to have someone to race. But that's a bit of a vicious cycle. People don't race because there's no one at their level, so other people at their level see that and don't race either.

    This post was edited by benjaminburr 2 years ago . 
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  • snider User since:
    Nov 30th, 2016
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    Snider said 2 years ago

    I was glad to see your name in the results Travis, I think you are right on for why you see a lull in the late 20s and early 30s.

    It takes a lot of effort to continue to run when you have responsibilities of family and work. My average week this last year was just around 60 kms, a fraction of the mileage in my mid 20s. This year I didn't think I would be able to race nationals even though it was practically in my back yard because of family obligations. I agree, that family obligations trumps training. I would rather see my daughter at the end of the day then go for a run in the day light.

    I can see how many people give up running when life hits them and people find more excuses not to run. However, the primary reason for me running has not changed, and maybe that is why I continue to run even with a high work and family demand. I run because I really enjoy it. It gives me that moment to escape the stresses of life and to enjoy the outdoor air.

    My enjoyment of the sport doesn't depend on the social aspect of a university team, or the competitiveness of winning a championship or a major race. In my early 20s, I am sure those were the main drivers to put in the mileage.
    When family and work obligations increase, the ability to make practice and stay competitive diminish. I do feel a lot of runners give up on the sport when the social and competitive elements of the sport are removed.

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  • cummings User since:
    Apr 1st, 2006
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    Cummings said 2 years ago

    Appreciate the two cents Derek and Ben and glad to see you both out racing on Saturday.

    In reality, there are lots of guys not ready to throw down in the Senior race for multiple reasons but still want to be competitive. Let's face it, even the guys filling up the last few spots at XC Nats in senior are still pretty legit athletes. I think the Master's Age Group, especially with the addition of the ability to run Sub-Master's, makes a huge difference for those of us who still want to be competitive but might have lost a few steps. It may actually be a bridge to get back in the Senior race because it provides an avenue to still test out the competitive chops without it being too discouraging. After all, there is less incentive to fly across the country to get your ass kicked when you are not ready to run with the Uni and twenties crowd. I would like to see Sub-Master's just be Master's at some point. I am sure there is justification for it not being so though, I'm just not knowledgeable enough on this topic to know what it is.

    By no means am I an advocate of celebrating mediocrity and I do not think it should be encouraged. However I don't think that is the image I am projecting here. The last thing we need is our XC Nats to end up like any weekend road race where 85% of the crowd leaves with a medal. That being said, having multiple opportunities for athletes at different levels of competitive readiness encourages participation, and as the participation rates increase, generally race quality correlates to a certain extent (at least in track/XC, not necessarily so in road racing). Reasonable adversity is always a great motivator for endurance athletes, the type of adversity you need to overcome changes with life circumstances, so it's healthy to have multiple competitive options at the national level.

    We need to keep sub-elite athletes involved in the sport. More often, they are the ones who organize races, coach in clubs and schools, and continue to contribute to the sport throughout their lifetime because of their "try-hard" attitude and stubborn optimism. As much as we all like to see national medalists, CIS/NCAA standouts, and world class competitors; these individuals generally are not always the ones who build the infrastructure that allowed them that opportunity, and by sheer probability, are less plentiful than sub-elites anyway (again, I must add, there are many exceptions to this statement!).

    Try-hards gotta keep tryin' hard.

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  • benjaminburr User since:
    Feb 23rd, 2013
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    benjaminburr said 2 years ago

    I actually have been thinking about the master's race as a bridge to get back in the senior race, like you said. I knew I wasn't in shape this year, but also felt like I needed a race to get myself going again and was pretty disappointed I wasn't in shape to race in Kingston last year either, so I just did it anyway. Next year, I'm hoping to be back in good enough shape to at least be competing for second-last in the senior race... Eventually, that won't be possible for me anymore, and I'll likely make a permanent switch to the masters categories at that point. It's never been my intention to stop completely.

    Quoting: Snider:
    "My enjoyment of the sport doesn't depend on the social aspect of a university team, or the competitiveness of winning a championship or a major race. In my early 20s, I am sure those were the main drivers to put in the mileage.
    When family and work obligations increase, the ability to make practice and stay competitive diminish. I do feel a lot of runners give up on the sport when the social and competitive elements of the sport are removed."


    I think this is a pretty key point. There's a big drop-off from high school to university as the teams get more competitive, and other options and higher stress levels lead to many people giving up on continuing in the sport. There's a similarly large drop-off after university as many of those who stuck with it lose the structure of the team environment. The camaraderie, the training group, the friendships, the strict practice schedule, and even the trips that are organized and supervised by coaching staff, all those things go away and you're left with: Do you enjoy running enough to put on your shoes and go do it?

    And then you add in work, and family and financial pressures. You're raising kids and they need a parent at home. You're married and your spouse deserves your attention and you've been at work all day so when are you going to find the time? You need to work overtime because the mortgage is coming due and that sudden car repair was unplanned and not in the budget (and student loan payments wait for no one), and can you really afford to skip an hour or two of work to get a run in today? You're tired from working late and it's been a stressful week and you just want to sit and watch tv and drink a beer, so you sit on your couch for hours and you don't have the energy to drag yourself out the door.

    Quoting: Cummings
    "We need to keep sub-elite athletes involved in the sport. More often, they are the ones who organize races, coach in clubs and schools, and continue to contribute to the sport throughout their lifetime because of their "try-hard" attitude and stubborn optimism. As much as we all like to see national medalists, CIS/NCAA standouts, and world class competitors; these individuals generally are not always the ones who build the infrastructure that allowed them that opportunity, and by sheer probability, are less plentiful than sub-elites anyway (again, I must add, there are many exceptions to this statement!)."


    To me, this is very important too. Our governing bodies seem to be focused on a top-down approach, but maybe a "bottom-up" approach would be better (if you can call it that?). Keeping more sub-elites in the sport could help push the entire competition group forward and raise everyone's level. Focusing on one person who might make a global final gives people someone to emulate and raises the bar at the very top, but emulating someone who is far beyond your level versus trying to beat someone who's just a bit ahead are, I would say, two different things. I feel like having someone to try to beat would lead to the better competition environment and improve participation and our top end more than a focus on one or two people.

    Sorry, not sure I worded that very well. I don't think I've really thought about it enough to put it into words.

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  • mattnorminton User since:
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    mattnorminton said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Cummings
    "Been a good while since I have posted on here; however this thread intrigued me so I figured I would chime in.

    I would argue that although theoretically the peak physiological age for distance running is 26-34, at least in North American society, and particularly in the sub-elite crowd (which is the majority of us), that age group is ripe for seeing a major lull in performance. I think for the most part, at least in my personal experience, I see more guys I have trained with (myself included), see major performance dips in the late 20's and early 30's only to have a resurgence starting mid-30's on.

    There are multiple reasons for this:

    1) Lots of guys (I am not necessarily discussing females here) hang on to their university glory for a year or two after they graduate to see where it takes them. More often than not they run pretty quickly but not fast enough to make a living off of it. They have fun for a time but realize, "SHIT, swift motion through space sure doesn't pay the bills". This generally puts them around 25-26 when they realize this, thus they get a job and have to make some major adjustments to their life circumstances, running takes the back burner as a result. Uni is fun and it is a hard thing to let go of.

    2) It's at this time that if you have been in the workforce, you tend to take more responsibility and establish yourself. This also means running is shelved for a time (or more often permanently). Time management is a real struggle throughout these years and it takes conscience effort to reorganize schedules and priorities to figure out how running will continue to be part of your lifestyle. You can't just skip class to get an extra couple hours of sleep if you want it.

    3) Related to #1 I guess (I know this is disjointed). Years of over-training and doing off-day runs too hard with the boys, coupled with boozy Saturday nights and then getting up for Sunday long runs in university starts to catch up big time in the late-twenties, early thirties, precisely at the same time career and family responsibilities become more important. This likely leads to burnout and injury that may last a few years, the body simply needs a break from the pounding of the last decade of high school and post-secondary competition; and burning the candle at both ends. Again, the runner must choose then if running is important enough to stick with, most choose it not to be.

    4) People start families, young families are a LOT of work, running isn't that important as a result.

    5) Master's running doesn't start until age 35, a lot of guys who are no longer good enough to compete with the top university and open athletes don't really have much to compete for until after they turn 35. Also, at this age, kids (if you have them) are generally older and more capable athletes, and you can do more things with them, introduce them to training. They are more self sufficient so you have more time to spend on yourself. By 35, people who have put the time in on their careers are pretty well established and you can often relax a little bit and still have a high level of competency. THIS IS WHY I THINK MASTER'S AGES SHOULD BE LOWERED TO AFTER 30, like XC skiing and swimming, pretty much no one in those sports competes after 30 and they need to keep people interested.

    There are probably more things I can add here, but you get the gist. Look at any road race or age group results, there are obvious exceptions; but often the 20-24 age categories and then the 35-39 age categories have proportionately better results than the 25-29 and 30-34 contingent (I am no exception, being 31, I'm in the midst of digging myself out of a multi-year malaise and general disinterest in being competitive in the sport due to all of the above things mentioned, minus the kid, however I coach a good chunk of them).

    So although the physiological prime may be in this 26-34 timeline, I think for a lot of people (mostly sub-elite, again, which is MOST OF US!), our actual prime circumstances for life happen later and as running is a but a microcosm of life, our race results reflect this reality.

    There are also many men who choose to have families later (post 35) but already have their career established, once they have children they already have the day to day sort of figured out. Having kids brings them great joy and stability, and they take being a role model pretty seriously. It's the motivation that lights the fire again for them, and you see older men running as fast as they were in university or their early twenties as a result.

    You have got to have something other than selfish goals to keep you training at a high level as you age, I think a lot of guys have a hard time figuring this out once they leave uni. Extrinsic motivation doesn't really work for older athletes.

    Come to think of it, I would say 50% of my peers or more in the Southern Alberta running scene have run lifetime PB's post 35. Most of them struggled or had other interests or responsibilities in late twenties, early thirties.

    Anyway, hope that sparks some conversation."


    Great post Travis and also the subsequent replies. A few thoughts:

    - there are not many "post collegiate" groups in the country. Especially for the "sub elite" crowds, those that need to get jobs to help pay the bills...
    - often training times for university groups do not align with real world work schedules, leaving post collegiates on their for many workouts. It can be tougher to stay motivated when you are on your own
    - it can be tough going from having your training and racing schedules laid out for you to having to do it yourself and also going from being a CIS "star" to just another senior runner. Often university/college coaches don't have the same amount of time for seniors as they do for their student athletes. Not making excuses for coaches, just saying it can be tough for them to find time for everyone, particularly when a group begins to bigger

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    - there are not many "post collegiate" groups in the country. Especially for the "sub elite"

    Bang, he got it right.

    Learning to run without a team challenging, it takes years to master and some are. Ever able to. I truly believe straying in the sport as you age requires success during university (glimmer of hope) to stay motivated and keep things going.

    Opportunity, this is key. Without the opportunity to learn from another runner or coach it can be pretty difficult to stay motivated.

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 years ago

    Lots of wisdom here.

    As someone who has been through the whole thing, I would just say this: If you really do love to train and compete, hang onto some kind of routine like grim death! Do not "accidentally" gain a lot of weight, if you think there is any chance at all that you might want to train seriously and race again. It is hard but it is far from impossible to train effectively and meet your adult obligations, and you will be an excellent role model for your kids should you pull it off. And it WILL get much easier as the years go by, believe it or not. It might also become as much fun again as when you were in school, if you can find the right group (and we really do need many more all-ages clubs, as I've been saying for years now). Everyone needs a serious hobby, and there aren't many better ones, for a whole host of physical, psychological, and social reasons, than serious distance running.

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  • gcrunner User since:
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    gcrunner said 2 years ago

    The older you are, the task of training to gain fitness gets ever harder as you move from 30s-40s-50s+. Training to keep the fitness as you age, on the other hand, is more pleasant and do-able. "Accidentally gaining a lot of weight" comes with a "heavier" price, the older you get. Hence the above advice to hang on like grim death.

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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Not much mention about the absence of Natasha - the defending National Champ - from the race this year. When our National Champ sits out in protest there are issues in the sport that need to be addressed. The lack of support for a recent Olympian, our current 10K record holder, and National Champ in her prime running years is sad.

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  • radioactive-rabbit User since:
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    Radioactive Rabbit said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Not much mention about the absence of Natasha - the defending National Champ - from the race this year. When our National Champ sits out in protest there are issues in the sport that need to be addressed. The lack of support for a recent Olympian, our current 10K record holder, and National Champ in her prime running years is sad."


    I think the reason why it hasn't been mention is her absence didn't really have a large impact. The fact is the women's race was loaded with talent and the race was exciting and there was still a winner at the end of the day. Overall I think missing race probably hurt her more than AC as she missed out on the best races on Canadian soil this year.

    It would be equivalent to asking why is no one talking about Levins and Ahmed missing Nationals after the race. Yes, they would have added depth and could have won Nationals like Wodak if she had raced, but at the end of the day both Senior races where exciting enough that we don't need to talk about what if this person was here.

    I do agree however this is an issue, the best Canadian runner not being funded, however I really don't think her protest had as large of impact as people thought it would.

    This post was edited by Radioactive Rabbit 2 years ago . 
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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Her not being at nationals is way different than the case of leading men who chose not to race. In her situation she is one of our leading woman who has been denied support and respect for years in the sport. She was right to make a stand and say enough is enough. She sent a clear message and her impact was huge.

    The race was good. It would have been better with Natasha in the race. If AC can't fairly fund deserving athletes and retain their interest in the sport it doesn't speak well for those who may follow her great lead in running.

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  • obvious User since:
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    Obvious said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "If AC can't fairly fund deserving athletes and retain their interest in the sport it doesn't speak well for those who may follow her great lead in running."


    Funding is a zero sum game.

    If you want to fund Natasha, you'll have to identify someone else to take funding away from.

    Whether she is 'deserving', you'd need to clarify how this works out in the points system that was established to determine who gets funding.

    Would your new points system leave out other 'deserving' athletes? Would your new points system pass muster with the message board crowd who like to flag administrators making unfair or biased decisions?

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 years ago

    I completely understand (and sympathize with) Natasha's decision to sit out all AC championships. But, as someone involved in the staging of the event, I would really like to find a way to have her (Lanni and Krista too) in the field in the next couple of years. If it's a matter of $, there are certainly things we can do (e.g. find a sponsor for some individual prize $ and/or try to find some travel support). I know Director Clive agrees with me that our aim is to make Nats XC the premier Canadian distance championship on the calendar. And now that the women's event is a true distance race, we are in position to make this happen over the next couple of years. Stay tuned.

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  • radioactive-rabbit User since:
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    Radioactive Rabbit said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Her not being at nationals is way different than the case of leading men who chose not to race. In her situation she is one of our leading woman who has been denied support and respect for years in the sport. She was right to make a stand and say enough is enough. She sent a clear message and her impact was huge.

    The race was good. It would have been better with Natasha in the race. If AC can't fairly fund deserving athletes and retain their interest in the sport it doesn't speak well for those who may follow her great lead in running."


    When I said the top men missing Nationals was the same as Natasha missing Nationals, I meant it as both races where exciting enough that when talking about the race after, people's first thoughts aren't about who wasn't there. Post race discussions should be focused about what people have accomplished in the race, not who wasn't in the race. The biggest impact of her standing up for herself was before nationals when she publicly announced she was not running.
    Obviously her choice to not race Nationals is based on a good reason and I do understand where she is coming from. Hopefully Oldster and Clive can work something out that when it comes to Nationals next year that gets her back in the field (along with Lanni and Krista). I am of the opinion that her not racing hurts Clive's and Oldster's efforts to put the best XC race possible and not really AC as much. The negative publicity hurt AC, but not her absence from the race. If she really wanted to hurt AC, she should pull a Nick Symonds and not race worlds. I think that would get AC attention more than her skipping a National Championship that lots of top runners miss anyway due to a variety of reasons.

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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    It had a large impact at the front - she was last year's winner! The race is weaker when none of the women who competed in the Olympics (3000m SC, 5000m, 10000m, marathon) show up to National XC. Two of the men showed up, making Proudfoot's win much more difficult this year compared to last year.


    Quoting: Radioactive Rabbit
    "I think the reason why it hasn't been mention is her absence didn't really have a large impact. The fact is the women's race was loaded with talent and the race was exciting and there was still a winner at the end of the day. Overall I think missing race probably hurt her more than AC as she missed out on the best races on Canadian soil this year.

    It would be equivalent to asking why is no one talking about Levins and Ahmed missing Nationals after the race. Yes, they would have added depth and could have won Nationals like Wodak if she had raced, but at the end of the day both Senior races where exciting enough that we don't need to talk about what if this person was here.

    I do agree however this is an issue, the best Canadian runner not being funded, however I really don't think her protest had as large of impact as people thought it would."

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  • ilovecollege User since:
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    ilovecollege said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Radioactive Rabbit
    "When I said the top men missing Nationals was the same as Natasha missing Nationals, I meant it as both races where exciting enough that when talking about the race after, people's first thoughts aren't about who wasn't there. Post race discussions should be focused about what people have accomplished in the race, not who wasn't in the race. The biggest impact of her standing up for herself was before nationals when she publicly announced she was not running.
    Obviously her choice to not race Nationals is based on a good reason and I do understand where she is coming from. Hopefully Oldster and Clive can work something out that when it comes to Nationals next year that gets her back in the field (along with Lanni and Krista). I am of the opinion that her not racing hurts Clive's and Oldster's efforts to put the best XC race possible and not really AC as much. The negative publicity hurt AC, but not her absence from the race. If she really wanted to hurt AC, she should pull a Nick Symonds and not race worlds. I think that would get AC attention more than her skipping a National Championship that lots of top runners miss anyway due to a variety of reasons."


    I'm not sure AC would really care if she opted to skip worlds. She may be Canada's best female 10k runner, but the reality is that AC is interested in athletes who they believe have the potential to reach podium or near-podium positions, as evidenced by the carding criteria. Unfortunately that type of performance probably isn't in the cards for her at this point. Skipping worlds would almost definitely be a move that hurt her more than AC. Obvious raises a good point, which I think people are too content to overlook when acting aghast that Natasha didn't receive funding. You can't get around the fact that there is only a limited pool of resources (whether or not that pool is insufficient is a different issue entirely). To give her a card you have to identify another athlete you feel is less deserving.

    That said, I think if you feel that it's appropriate to express dissatisfaction that she didn't get a card, you should suggest another athlete who should have their funding pulled along with your comment. If you can't think of one, then your issue isn't really with the fact that she didn't get funding, but that there just isn't enough of it to go around, and that's where the criticism should be directed.

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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anonymous
    ""



    Bogus, have you looked at the times of top ten women? Outstanding performances and depth. The field was stacked this year and those girls ARE just as good as anyone else. Any olympian that lined up on Saturday would have been given a run for their money! Sub 34 on a muddy, rolling course is outstanding.

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    Missing the point said 2 years ago

    Natasha is/has been injured. She wouldn't have raced at nationals even if she had been carded this year. She used "not racing at nationals" as a media play purely in self interest. Don't think I can remeber ever seen her fight for other athletes rights - it is only when it affects her personally.

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  • myth User since:
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    Myth said 2 years ago

    Unless I'm mistaken - I had heard that Wodak was injured through part the fall (including when she made her post that she would not be racing ACXC).

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  • radioactive-rabbit User since:
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    Radioactive Rabbit said 2 years ago

    Quoting: ilovecollege
    "I'm not sure AC would really care if she opted to skip worlds. She may be Canada's best female 10k runner, but the reality is that AC is interested in athletes who they believe have the potential to reach podium or near-podium positions, as evidenced by the carding criteria. Unfortunately that type of performance probably isn't in the cards for her at this point. Skipping worlds would almost definitely be a move that hurt her more than AC. Obvious raises a good point, which I think people are too content to overlook when acting aghast that Natasha didn't receive funding. You can't get around the fact that there is only a limited pool of resources (whether or not that pool is insufficient is a different issue entirely). To give her a card you have to identify another athlete you feel is less deserving.

    That said, I think if you feel that it's appropriate to express dissatisfaction that she didn't get a card, you should suggest another athlete who should have their funding pulled along with your comment. If you can't think of one, then your issue isn't really with the fact that she didn't get funding, but that there just isn't enough of it to go around, and that's where the criticism should be directed."


    You are very right with this post. I don't think AC really does care if she chooses to race or not, I think she would get more media attention if she did miss world's, but again, like skipping nationals, this would hurt her more than anyone else. I personally think she shouldn't skip anything because she didn't get funding. Racing and winning (or trying to win) Nationals would send a stronger message. But then again hearing she wasn't going to race anyway because of injury, that's interesting.
    I think any athlete who gets funding deserves it. My issue is more with a) Did her not racing Nationals really do anything? B) Would she be willing to take and expand this protest to everything to do AC like national Champs, worlds, etc. Answer: a) not really, b)probably not.

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  • cummings User since:
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    Cummings said 2 years ago

    "Grim death", that is almost as memorable as "Gaunt is beautiful".

    Just to clarify, I was not complaining or seeking justification for sub-par performances; I was merely discussing what I deem legitimate observations from a perspective of someone who has been in the sport for an extended period of time as an athlete and a coach, just like many of you as well.

    However, positive encouragement is always welcomed and I do thank those who offer advice and share their perspectives, I think it is helpful for everyone who reads these posts.

    If anything, I was more stating reasons why it is important for athletes in their late twenties-early thirties to stick with it rather than quit. If you are persistent it always gets better, even though it may be frustrating. I have been a little disgruntled seeing men my age who are very talented drop out of the sport because they lose interest with excuses like lack of time; or the bullshit comment "I'm too old for this shit" line. Some people obviously just naturally get different interests but I think people do themselves a serious disservice by giving up on their passions because life gets busy. As Steve pointed out, we all need a serious hobby; and that hobby is important whether you are excelling at it or struggling with it in the moment.

    Matt, if more individuals had your vision for a training group the sport would be healthier in this country as a whole. Oldster has a similar crew in Kingston, and I have been fortunate enough to have had experience with both situations throughout my training years and I have incorporated many things I learned in those situations into my own philosophies on coaching. It's just not that common to have high school, university, post-collegiate, and senior/master's athletes training under the same umbrella; it's a beautiful thing when it does happen though. Van Tighem actually does a pretty job with that in Calgary as well, however the practice times for UCAC are horrid for older athletes so it's tough for the working crowd like myself to make it out. However, I would never question the quality of the individual of MVT, one of the best coaches, and frankly, best people, I have ever met.

    In summation to this post; I think stubbornness is an undervalued character trait in runners. A lot of us keep plugging away because we are just too damn stubborn to quit. We disguise this trait with fancier words like resilience and perseverance, when really we just have too much pride to let it go, it's a healthy way to feed the ego; nothing wrong with that.

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    Anon said 2 years ago

    Thank you for a very Trump-like post - many superlatives and assertions, nothing to back it!

    The fact is Canada sent 8 distance women (3000m steeple and up) to the Olympics and NONE of them showed up to National XC. Gollish and Cliff were very close to making the Olympics (actually Cliff made it, but that's another discussion) and they also went 1-2.

    Olympians have proven they're better than the others - that's how they made the Olympics. The top 10 women at National XC would have been very different if they were there.


    Quoting: Anonymous
    "Bogus, have you looked at the times of top ten women? Outstanding performances and depth. The field was stacked this year and those girls ARE just as good as anyone else. Any olympian that lined up on Saturday would have been given a run for their money! Sub 34 on a muddy, rolling course is outstanding."

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Cummings
    ""Grim death", that is almost as memorable as "Gaunt is beautiful".

    Just to clarify, I was not complaining or seeking justification for sub-par performances; I was merely discussing what I deem legitimate observations from a perspective of someone who has been in the sport for an extended period of time as an athlete and a coach, just like many of you as well.

    However, positive encouragement is always welcomed and I do thank those who offer advice and share their perspectives, I think it is helpful for everyone who reads these posts.

    If anything, I was more stating reasons why it is important for athletes in their late twenties-early thirties to stick with it rather than quit. If you are persistent it always gets better, even though it may be frustrating. I have been a little disgruntled seeing men my age who are very talented drop out of the sport because they lose interest with excuses like lack of time; or the bullshit comment "I'm too old for this shit" line. Some people obviously just naturally get different interests but I think people do themselves a serious disservice by giving up on their passions because life gets busy. As Steve pointed out, we all need a serious hobby; and that hobby is important whether you are excelling at it or struggling with it in the moment.

    Matt, if more individuals had your vision for a training group the sport would be healthier in this country as a whole. Oldster has a similar crew in Kingston, and I have been fortunate enough to have had experience with both situations throughout my training years and I have incorporated many things I learned in those situations into my own philosophies on coaching. It's just not that common to have high school, university, post-collegiate, and senior/master's athletes training under the same umbrella; it's a beautiful thing when it does happen though. Van Tighem actually does a pretty job with that in Calgary as well, however the practice times for UCAC are horrid for older athletes so it's tough for the working crowd like myself to make it out. However, I would never question the quality of the individual of MVT, one of the best coaches, and frankly, best people, I have ever met.

    In summation to this post; I think stubbornness is an undervalued character trait in runners. A lot of us keep plugging away because we are just too damn stubborn to quit. We disguise this trait with fancier words like resilience and perseverance, when really we just have too much pride to let it go, it's a healthy way to feed the ego; nothing wrong with that."


    Again, much wisdom in this thread.

    I would underline my point about not giving up your routine at ANY point, if you can possibly help it. And by routine I mean just committing to getting out the door every day. Do not overthink it. There are times when you will wonder why you're putting your gear on what it's all about; you will have no particular plan in mind, and no immediate race goal. But as long as you're getting out the door, your options will remain open; and, the run, no matter what its length or longer term purpose, is always a great clarifier. The busier your life, the more it is enriched by a little solitude and simplicity-- by just the completion of a hard thing whose only point is itself; the climbing of a little mountain every day.

    Looking back over the decades, it seems that every time I've overcome the inevitable existential doubt about going out the door for yet another run or workout, something rewarding in my running life has happened very soon after; something I would not have been able to enjoy had I just let running slip away in a muddle of daily commitments. Do not be fooled into thinking that your life will somehow be easier or more rewarding by removing the simple, challenging bits (a folly that SO many mid-20 something runners commit). If you manage to find a worthy substitute for the run, you're lucky. But never imagine that another hour per day of the usual-- staring at the internet, fussing over your work (and, trust me, you won't be more productive if you quit running; very likely the opposite), or hanging out with your friends-- is going to make you happier than running, once running has become a part of your life. There will be times when going for another run will feel like the LAST thing you want to do, but chances are good that it'll still be better than the alternative of NOT going.

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    Can you Explain said 2 years ago

    why Proudfoot, Bruchet, Hughes and Cliff all said no?

    Does anyone know why?

    http://athletics.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/2017-IAAF-World-XC_TeamList_EN.pdf?mc_cid=0e2ea399fb&mc_eid=973b81b9eb

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  • steveweiler User since:
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    SteveWeiler said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Anon
    "Olympians have proven they're better than the others - that's how they made the Olympics. The top 10 women at National XC would have been very different if they were there.
    "


    We partially went over this kind of stuff back in the Chiba threads. Olympians proved they're better than the other athletes at the specific event they qualified for the Olympics in. While a 3000m steeplechaser could very well be a great 10k XC runner, the correlation isn't as direct as you're suggesting. Most importantly, it wouldn't be as simple a matter as just showing up: they would need to chose to train towards the event in order to make a significant impact, and there could be a variety of reasons why they chose not to train towards 10k XC this fall.

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    Andrew Jones said 2 years ago

    Picking up on the "longevity" part of this thread, from having run for over three decades, and talking with my cohorts that have run for that long or longe -- and have continued on, we've identified some "types" of runners that seem to explain who goes on with the sport, and who doesn't. It goes like this:

    1) those that succeed at running, but run to succeed, mainly. In other words, this group would readily do any competitive sport where they did well...they just happened to find running/running found them at some point.

    2) those who succeed at running, but also love to run.

    3) those who are modestly or infrequently successful in competitive running, but love the activity so much that they never halt the quotidian routine.

    4) those whose running is curtailed, unfortunately, owing to injury or the taking on of job responsibilites and/or family support.

    I've left out the chronological part of the discussion, because I think these four, basic types of runners can start/continue on/finish at any point in their lives. Granted, those that are successful after a late start may be more likely to do until their old age, but this is not always the case. Conversely, those that start early may be more likely to "burn out" their interest over the long-haul, but we do see (especially in the almost-200-runner field at Nationals XC) many runners "keeping on keeping on".

    So, it is groups 2) and 3) above, it seems, that tend to keep at it in a serious way over the long haul.

    Another sub-thread or new thread here may be something like: "The Running Stride: A Medidative Mantra?" In other words, running, owing to its repetitive nature, is as Steve B. mentions, just a nice, peaceful respite from life's stresses.

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    Quoting: SteveWeiler
    "We partially went over this kind of stuff back in the Chiba threads. Olympians proved they're better than the other athletes at the specific event they qualified for the Olympics in. While a 3000m steeplechaser could very well be a great 10k XC runner, the correlation isn't as direct as you're suggesting. Most importantly, it wouldn't be as simple a matter as just showing up: they would need to chose to train towards the event in order to make a significant impact, and there could be a variety of reasons why they chose not to train towards 10k XC this fall."


    Alycia Butterworth - 2015 24th, 2016 25th. Between times ran a Rio qualifying time at 3000s/c.

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  • meizner User since:
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    Meizner said 2 years ago

    Can't emphasize this point enough. As someone who has 'run through', undergrad, med school, residency, getting married, having 3 kids, holding down a job I can tell you that at every point people told me I would never be able to continue to do what I was doing (running 60-90 minutes/ day). Fortunately, I didn't listen to them and kept doing it because I loved it and it was part of who I was.

    The mantra that stopping running will allow you to do better in school or work or anything else is usually a cop-out and a sign that you either don't love the sport any more or have very poor organizational skills.

    Sure it takes creativity, a lack of self doubt, a commitment to getting out the door regardless of your 'condition'. However, the 'payback' is always worth it.


    Quoting: Oldster
    "Again, much wisdom in this thread.

    I would underline my point about not giving up your routine at ANY point, if you can possibly help it. And by routine I mean just committing to getting out the door every day. Do not overthink it. There are times when you will wonder why you're putting your gear on what it's all about; you will have no particular plan in mind, and no immediate race goal. But as long as you're getting out the door, your options will remain open; and, the run, no matter what its length or longer term purpose, is always a great clarifier. The busier your life, the more it is enriched by a little solitude and simplicity-- by just the completion of a hard thing whose only point is itself; the climbing of a little mountain every day.

    Looking back over the decades, it seems that every time I've overcome the inevitable existential doubt about going out the door for yet another run or workout, something rewarding in my running life has happened very soon after; something I would not have been able to enjoy had I just let running slip away in a muddle of daily commitments. Do not be fooled into thinking that your life will somehow be easier or more rewarding by removing the simple, challenging bits (a folly that SO many mid-20 something runners commit). If you manage to find a worthy substitute for the run, you're lucky. But never imagine that another hour per day of the usual-- staring at the internet, fussing over your work (and, trust me, you won't be more productive if you quit running; very likely the opposite), or hanging out with your friends-- is going to make you happier than running, once running has become a part of your life. There will be times when going for another run will feel like the LAST thing you want to do, but chances are good that it'll still be better than the alternative of NOT going."

    This post was edited by Meizner 2 years ago . 
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  • myth User since:
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    Myth said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Can you Explain
    "why Proudfoot, Bruchet, Hughes and Cliff all said no?

    Does anyone know why?

    http://athletics.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/2017-IAAF-World-XC_TeamList_EN.pdf?mc_cid=0e2ea399fb&mc_eid=973b81b9eb"



    Presumably because they are focused on Worlds Track, and don't feel a 10km XC race in Africa is the ideal prep for the early spring West Coast races.

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  • cummings User since:
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    Cummings said 2 years ago

    "I would underline my point about not giving up your routine at ANY point, if you can possibly help it. And by routine I mean just committing to getting out the door every day. Do not overthink it. "

    Good advice.

    Also good advice from McInnes

    This post was edited by Cummings 2 years ago . 
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    Anon said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Myth
    "Unless I'm mistaken - I had heard that Wodak was injured through part the fall (including when she made her post that she would not be racing ACXC)."


    She was planning this instead it would appear. Doubling on 10K and half marathon in Barbados.

    http://runningmagazine.ca/run-barbados-marathon-weekend-2016/

    And getting a lesson in early celebration.

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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Meizner
    "The mantra that stopping running will allow you to do better in school or work or anything else is usually a cop-out and a sign that you either don't love the sport any more or have very poor organizational skills. . "


    As someone whose family includes a surgeon, lawyers, an aerospace engineer, a dentist, a chemical engineer, etc. I'm always a bit turned off by the type 'A' "tough it out" crowd.

    Do you have family with a disabled child? Have you traveled the world and volunteered your time with poor children, who don't have enough to eat, never mind have enough to run on? Do you have 5 kids? 7 kids?

    Did you run 60-90 minutes every day of med school? Of your residency?

    Don't get me wrong, 60 minutes is a good goal to aim for. But, as Oldster has said before, some things in life are more important than running. And sometimes running needs to go on the back-burner. It doesn't mean you don't love the sport, aren't "organized" enough, or any other stupid insult the "type As" throw your way. It's prioritization! Hopefully, you don't make running a priority over the really meaningful things in life (like family, or helping a friend).

    Prioritize correctly and you'll find you can find respite (and enjoyment) in lifelong running.

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  • buddy User since:
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    Buddy said 2 years ago

    A friend of mine sent her kids off the private School in NY then ran Boston 2 Big Sur 9 years in a row. (Yes kids went to Uni in the USA as well)

    Wait till these kids are 35 :)

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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Cummings
    ""I would underline my point about not giving up your routine at ANY point, if you can possibly help it. And by routine I mean just committing to getting out the door every day. Do not overthink it. "

    Good advice.

    Also good advice from McInnes"


    Good advice?? I think most competitive runners understand the need to get out the door everyday. But people have all kinds of life situations that cause running to take a backseat from time to time. I can also think of all kinds of examples of runners (or athletes from different sports) who passed up opportunity in pursuit of something more noble than "getting out the door" for a run every day.

    I'm baffled by all this "good advice" we continually hear on the boards from guys whose examples aren't particularly remarkable. Perhaps in Canada, where running isn't a major sport, they stand out as exceptional.

    Do we tell kids with stage 4 cancer to "suck it up buttercup"? That advice isn't productive. Give us something real.

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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    If I was a young university runner wanting advice, I would be much more inclined to pick up a book by Adharanand Finn and enjoy it with a good mug of spiked eggnog than to listen to a guy whose claim-to-fame is missing the Olympics by seconds, or teaching a half-assed subject in a half-assed way. And who is dismissive of other cultures and what they have to offer.

    "[a] few weeks after I return from Japan, the British half-marathon trials take place...The winner, Scott Overall, runs a time of 64 minutes 44 seconds. On the very same day, in Japan, the national university half-marathon championships take place. The student in that race finishing way back in 100th position runs almost exactly the same time as Overall, the British champion, finishing in a time of 64:47."

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Andrew Cojones
    "Good advice?? I think most competitive runners understand the need to get out the door everyday. But people have all kinds of life situations that cause running to take a backseat from time to time. I can also think of all kinds of examples of runners (or athletes from different sports) who passed up opportunity in pursuit of something more noble than "getting out the door" for a run every day.

    I'm baffled by all this "good advice" we continually hear on the boards from guys whose examples aren't particularly remarkable. Perhaps in Canada, where running isn't a major sport, they stand out as exceptional.

    Do we tell kids with stage 4 cancer to "suck it up buttercup"? That advice isn't productive. Give us something real."


    I don't think either Matt or I was suggesting that anyone who doesn't get out the door for a run everyday is somehow inferior to those of us who do manage it, and have done so through some very busy times. And I, for one, would never deny that there are many more important things in life than running (indeed, there are many more important things in life than the vast majority of activities to which most of us devote our time-- running shouldn't be singled out here). My target was those among us who say that they would like to train for running but simply don't have the time. In my experience, this is usually a cover for not really wanting to do it. And it is not moralistic to say this. It is objectively true that the vast majority of people devote more than an hour per day to activities that are easily as inessential to their survival as family members and citizens as is running, and that they make a choice to do these other things instead of running-- likely because running is hard and these other things are typically not (consider the fact, e.g., that, every day in the summer months, there are thousands of people-- men, usually-- on golf courses. A round of golf takes 3-4 hours. Where do people find the time?). If you don't want to do it, admit it. In the vast majority of cases, there is a way to do it if you really love it. It is the world's simplest sport. It does not require a group or expensive facilities, and it can be done almost anywhere, any time.

    To suggest that what Matt and I are saying is comparable to telling cancer-ridden child to "suck it up" is ludicrous, and I think you know it (and are only saying it because you have the courage of the anonymous and, likely, the stupidity of the young). You know that Matt is a father and a physician, who actually has to deal with cancer victims in his daily professional life, right?

    Finally, how we both did competitively is completely beside the point. We did a thing we loved to the best of our ability when we could, and made no excuses. Can you suggest a better way to approach one's life? Would we have somehow done a service to humanity had we been a little faster?

    This post was edited by Oldster 2 years ago . 
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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    I would say your latter post is a more fair discussion of "what it takes" Oldster.

    I just get sick and tired of these cliches used by "experienced" runners who hold themselves up as models of success! And, as someone who has personally had cancer, I was sick of the cliches people spouted out about tackling cancer with a "positive attitude". LiveStrong! What the heck are you talking about?!?

    I can imagine Matt (like the physicians that treated my cancer) has much more real conversations with his patients. Likewise, it's not productive to tell student runners that they should "get out the door everyday", because you did. How do you know what their life situation is.

    I personally prefer reading the advice of all kinds of exemplary "world's best" runners and coaches. Thankfully, the internet has made this possible. (Who of us asked for advice anyway?) One particular runner I admire is Yuki Kuwauchi who is under no illusion that running is as easy as "getting out the door". All kinds of runners "get out the door" but never reach the level you did Oldster. Anyway, Kuwauchi talks about how he had to re-adjust to realistic goals (realising he would never run a 2:05 marathon, he stopped focusing on achieving this time). He also talks about making running work with his schedule. His discussion is the kind of thing I think young runners need. It's real, it's practical, and it's inspirational for young Japanese runners.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm sure you and Matt can be (and are) role models in some way. But for goodness sake, give the kids something real. Especially, heading into exam season!

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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    Btw, Oldster - as a long time golfer I can say that one of the reasons golf works for the "average joe with a family" is that the effort isn't necessarily cumulative. You can take 1-2 weeks off and come back very rapidly (e.g. within days) to play the best golf of your life. Yes, it's 3-4 hours per round (sometimes 5-6 at local golf courses), but you don't have to play every day to play the level of golf most local golfers (i.e. "family men") play at. Most local golfers don't even play by the rules. I played 25-30 times the past summer (either 9 holes or 18) and didn't see a single player play by the rules (e.g. finish all their putts, take penalties, etc.). I also tried to improve my game by spending 30 minutes at the chipping green, 30 minutes at the range, or 30 minutes on the putting green.

    Step up to the PGA level, or college golf level and you will find golfers putting in the same amount of time as runners. College golfers hit balls in the morning, lift weights in the afternoon, and play in the evenings and the weekends. Right now, the NCAA seems to be the only college system in the world which allows students to balance their time commitments with school - so, they are churning out the largest number of golfers that go on to compete at a world level. Jared du Toit is an example of a Canadian golfer who has excelled in the NCAA system.

    2 of my teenage friends went on to play college golf, a 3rd played in the Canadian Open, and a 4th is head pro of one of Canada's best clubs. But none of them would tell you it was as easy as going out to "beat balls everyday".

    I could go on to name a bunch of runners I ran with - some who balanced life and running very well, some who had to make difficult choices to leave the sport, and some who pursued something more noble than running. I guess they all got out the door for something or other every day. Don't we all?

    Would anyone like to start a list for running? Cliches your running coach uses?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sports_clich%C3%A9s

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Anonymous said 2 years ago

    If you want to run, run. If you find another passion that you prefer, do it.

    What's the big deal.

    If you want to stick with it you'll find a way to make it work and you'll make sacrifices along the way if it truly is that important to you. And if you decide it's not, there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. No one is better than anyone else for carrying on with running and I don't think anyone in the above thread is implying they are.

    Oldster, Cummings and Matt are simply sharing their experience and likely want to pass along knowledge as they have greatly benefited from getting out the door each day. Perhaps you've misunderstood them.

    It's okay to not run!

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    Anon, I know... said 2 years ago

    Gee, whiz. There's a lot of anger here.

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  • meizner User since:
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    Meizner said 2 years ago

    I think, cojones, that you have misunderstood the point I am trying to make.

    Bottom line is if you love to run, and enjoy doing it every day, don't let anyone tell you that doing so will compromise your studies/ social life/ job etc. That's all-- I'm not telling anyone they have to buck up and run through illness or anything else silly you might be implying.

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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    Meizner... can I be blamed for the misunderstanding???

    You said:
    "The mantra that stopping running will allow you to do better in school or work or anything else is usually a cop-out and a sign that you either don't love the sport any more or have very poor organizational skills.

    Sure it takes creativity, a lack of self doubt, a commitment to getting out the door regardless of your 'condition'. However, the 'payback' is always worth it."

    Frankly, I find it discouraging that you, Oldster, or anyone else on the boards says "look at the level I reached" and holds it up as an example. And then, when someone points out your level of running has been leapfrogged by hundreds of university aged Japanese runners, you both get insulted.

    But I'm happy we're getting more objective. Many young runners will get "out the door" everyday but never reach the level Oldster did in running - for a variety of different reasons! This isn't necessarily failure. As Kuwauchi highlights, sometimes a "successful" runner knows their limits and reaches their potential (or as near to it as possible) given the different constraints and conditions of life.

    So yeah, I think you can stop running if you have a different priority on the go and pick it back up again when your priorities change. How is that a cop-out, or a sign that you don't love the sport of running?

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  • meizner User since:
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    Meizner said 2 years ago

    I'm not insulted and am firmly aware that any achievements I had in running were modest at best.

    I'm not talking about running and competing-- I'm just talking about going for a run every day. If you love it, do it, you can make it work. Far from compromising other goals you have in life-- running every day (same as any other form of exercise) will likely increase the probability you will achieve them. This is contrary to what most people will tell you. More often than not I've heard (from non-runners/ generally sedentary folk):
    - you can't run and focus on your undergrad studies
    - you can't run and get into med school
    - you can't run after getting married
    - you can't run after having kids
    etc. etc. etc.

    Once again, my point is that if you want to make it happen, you will be able to. If you don't want to and feel like doing something else have at 'er. Don't let me stop you!

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  • cummings User since:
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    Cummings said 2 years ago

    Anonymous said 5 seconds ago
    Quoting: Andrew Cojones
    "Meizner... can I be blamed for the misunderstanding???

    You said:
    "The mantra that stopping running will allow you to do better in school or work or anything else is usually a cop-out and a sign that you either don't love the sport any more or have very poor organizational skills.

    Sure it takes creativity, a lack of self doubt, a commitment to getting out the door regardless of your 'condition'. However, the 'payback' is always worth it."

    Frankly, I find it discouraging that you, Oldster, or anyone else on the boards says "look at the level I reached" and holds it up as an example. And then, when someone points out your level of running has been leapfrogged by hundreds of university aged Japanese runners, you both get insulted.

    But I'm happy we're getting more objective. Many young runners will get "out the door" everyday but never reach the level Oldster did in running - for a variety of different reasons! This isn't necessarily failure. As Kuwauchi highlights, sometimes a "successful" runner knows their limits and reaches their potential (or as near to it as possible) given the different constraints and conditions of life.

    So yeah, I think you can stop running if you have a different priority on the go and pick it back up again when your priorities change. How is that a cop-out, or a sign that you don't love the sport of running?"


    Cojones, I think you are misinterpreting posters to this thread sharing their personal experiences as preaching to an audience of followers.

    I am an individual of modest accomplishments (I also know my limits!), and I have other interests and priorities, but I still see the value in why participating in a sport as vigorous as running is a worthwhile venture. AND I really enjoy hearing why others do it despite the obvious "real world" responsibilities (or adversities) they have. It's good inspiration and it is informative for everyone to hear and share their stories in a productive manner while remaining impartial. I really don't think Boyd or McInnes were being preachy or speaking from an elitist perspective; which is obviously how it got interpreted.

    In fact, in a previous post, I even clarified my position that I wasn't looking for advice, and was merely wanting to hear and share stories; I don't know why that would be any way controversial. I'm pretty confident in my own abilities as a runner and a coach, but I am not naive enough to think that I could reap no benefit from hearing the perspectives of other coaches and athletes who are as accomplished or more accomplished than myself. HOWEVER, I am also not object to hearing and accepting advice when it is generously given. I think it's important to continually grow and learn as you advance as a coach and/or an athlete, you achieve this by providing and accepting advice on occasion.

    I have other priorities, like everyone else here! I am a teacher, coach, high school XC sport chair, and department head of my school. I also spend a lot of time cross country skiing (and ski racing), fly fishing (all over NA), and more recently am learning how to mush dogs. Although I have no children yet, that will probably be something on the fore-front sooner rather than later (my students and athletes are usually enough!) --> RUNNING HAS ALWAYS BEEN THE CONSTANT THAT MAKES ALL OF THESE ACTIVITIES POSSIBLE however. I wouldn't have the drive to be physically active if I didn't have the fitness and motivation from running to challenge myself in other ventures.

    This was more of a discussion (at least originally) as to how we can keep older athletes involved, and that conversation naturally progresses to personal accounts as to why, as multi-faceted individuals, people still find the passion to do it; amid their other, and sometimes as you stated, more nobler commitments. I would also argue that for many people who have shared thoughts here; we have lived through lots of changes, which includes successes and failures, in life and in running. Yet we still come back to it, it's always interesting to know why people still find it valuable, and that ultimately is beneficial to the children (or adults) you influence, whether they are your athletes you coach, OR your own children. Everyone has different reasons why it's valuable, it's important to listen to the reasons; and also important to express an opinion if it is useful to forwarding the conversation; opinions come from personal experiences, so well, you do the math.

    In an ideal world, I would love to see every athlete I coach end up making running a part of their life long-term; no matter what capacity it becomes, because I understand how much of a life changing benefit it can be. Whether I am running 31 minutes in a past life or 35-36 minutes in a present life for 10km, it still holds the same value; although the reasons for its value may change. Any coach or coach-athlete who cares about their athletes and who is passionate about the sport wants that for the people they influence. So in this respect, more information is always better to understand what motivates people; this would entail sharing examples of how living an active lifestyle is possible amid perceived insurmountable odds. In order to accomplish exactly what you suggested Cojones, be an inspiration. Success looks different for every athlete, I am more interested in learning how to achieve success for an athlete on their terms and their ability level, not on what I may view as objective success. If you hit the athlete on the right wavelength, you will get them to achieve things they never thought were possible. And, as is brutally obvious with Steve's program at Queen's, he clearly does a good job doing this. He's not the only coach who posts on here who gets similar results; and I am always eager to hear how coaches achieve success with their athletes. Why wouldn't we want to hear what knowledgeable people have to say?

    So in summation, no one really used the colloquialism, "Get out the door everyday and you can be as good as me", as dogmatic pontification. Really what was shared, as an overall theme, was that consistency is important; and people shared their stories as to how they have been able to be consistent amid sometimes chaotic life circumstances. No one was projecting a personal superiority complex; I certainly never interpreted that from any post here about this particular topic.

    I understand the emotional reaction for sure, but if you understand the essence of what was attempting to be projected you get why the emotional reaction isn't necessary. Seems like passion might have been mistaken for arrogance.

    TC

    Posted twice accidently, sorry! Moderator can take down the anonymous post with same text.

    This post was edited by Cummings 2 years ago . 
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  • mattnorminton User since:
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    mattnorminton said 2 years ago

    Looks to me like Cojones is just looking for an argument and probably just needs to get out for a run to burn off some energy...I would politely suggest that you guys ignore him/her and just carry on. If anyone doesn't like what Oldster/Matt/Travis has posted, they can chose not to read their advice.

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Andrew Cojones
    "Meizner... can I be blamed for the misunderstanding???

    You said:
    "The mantra that stopping running will allow you to do better in school or work or anything else is usually a cop-out and a sign that you either don't love the sport any more or have very poor organizational skills.

    Sure it takes creativity, a lack of self doubt, a commitment to getting out the door regardless of your 'condition'. However, the 'payback' is always worth it."

    Frankly, I find it discouraging that you, Oldster, or anyone else on the boards says "look at the level I reached" and holds it up as an example. And then, when someone points out your level of running has been leapfrogged by hundreds of university aged Japanese runners, you both get insulted.

    But I'm happy we're getting more objective. Many young runners will get "out the door" everyday but never reach the level Oldster did in running - for a variety of different reasons! This isn't necessarily failure. As Kuwauchi highlights, sometimes a "successful" runner knows their limits and reaches their potential (or as near to it as possible) given the different constraints and conditions of life.

    So yeah, I think you can stop running if you have a different priority on the go and pick it back up again when your priorities change. How is that a cop-out, or a sign that you don't love the sport of running?"


    Show me where I made any reference to the competitive level I achieved? This is completely irrelevant. I don't know what you think you're arguing against, but it's certainly not anything I have said. Like Matt, all I said was not to mistake not really having a passion for this sport with not having the time to do it. And, yeah, I will tell undergrads to get out the door every day. Without realizing it, they have more spare time and energy than they will likely ever have again in their lives. If you feel like you can't get out running every day as a STUDENT, then you simply don't want to run. Best to make your peace with that fact and stop thinking of yourself as a serious, competitive runner.

    And, of course, there are limits. There really ARE people who simply don't have the time, energy, or good health to train every day. But, I really doubt many of these people are looking in on Trackie. So, what's your real concern about Matt's and my advice to younger runners? (Actually, never mind. I don't really want to know).

    This post was edited by Oldster 2 years ago . 
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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Cummings

    So in summation, no one really used the colloquialism, "Get out the door everyday and you can be as good as me", as dogmatic pontification. Really what was shared, as an overall theme, was that consistency is important; and people shared their stories as to how they have been able to be consistent amid sometimes chaotic life circumstances. No one was projecting a personal superiority complex; I certainly never interpreted that from any post here about this particular topic.

    I understand the emotional reaction for sure, but if you understand the essence of what was attempting to be projected you get why the emotional reaction isn't necessary. Seems like passion might have been mistaken for arrogance.

    TC

    Posted twice accidently, sorry! Moderator can take down the anonymous post with same text."


    I think this was a fair post, so I will accept the correction Cummings. Consistency is something different than the pressure on young runners to run no matter what (otherwise you are a "cop out" or "someone who doesn't love the sport", etc.).

    From what I hear, Matt is generally a stand up guy so I don't think he intended this. But I do think people need to be careful with their wording here. Are we motivating or intimidating?

    Regarding Oldster, I do sense a tone of arrogance (or grouchiness, if you prefer). And I wonder, would his advice be as revered on the boards if not for:
    1) Canada's low population density?
    2) The fact that running isn't a major sport in Canada?
    3) The fact that motivated athletes generally find avenues and facilities to succeed (university sport being one of them)?

    Should we listen to someone who spits out cliches like "just get out the door". Then, when challenged - anonymously, or otherwise, turns into Oscar the Grouch, asks you to email him privately, says "this is all the advice you will get for free", rounds up his buddies, and generally bullies people on the boards. Pretty much does everything but get up in your face like a 140lb tough guy... And then wonders why people post anon?? Don't feed us this b.s.! It's this jerk-*ss mentality that turns people off competitive running!

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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 2 years ago

    Regarding Oldster, I do sense a tone of arrogance (or grouchiness, if you prefer). And I wonder, would his advice be as revered on the boards if not for:
    1) Canada's low population density?
    2) The fact that running isn't a major sport in Canada?
    3) The fact that motivated athletes generally find avenues and facilities to succeed (university sport being one of them)?

    -------------------

    I guess I tend to like well-informed and passionate people like Steve -- regardless of these three (to me, irrelevant) factors. And he does share wisdom that others (dubiously, in some cases) charged $$$ for.

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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    I'm with you on his passion! And he shares his "wisdom" with you - whether you want it or not!
    But posting on this board is part of his job? Seriously?!? Where do we sign up and how do we get paid for these jobs?

    This post was edited by a Moderator [Issues] 2 years ago . 
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    Andrew Cojones said 2 years ago

    ... As always, no discussion of the context. Who is the athlete we are giving advice to? What is their motivation? What outside influences are affecting their performance? Are they a good student (ala McInnes), or do they struggle in their academic life? Do they need to be pushed or held back?

    In my experience, a good coach understands the athlete and works with the athlete with an understanding of the context. I don't believe for a second Oldster works in generalisations.

    Ok Andrew... once again... thanks for everything. : )

    This post was edited by a Moderator [Issues] 2 years ago . 
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  • anonymous Anonymous
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    Andrew Jones said 2 years ago

    ... As always, no discussion of the context. Who is the athlete we are giving advice to? What is their motivation? What outside influences are affecting their performance? Are they a good student (ala McInnes), or do they struggle in their academic life? Do they need to be pushed or held back?

    In my experience, a good coach understands the athlete and works with the athlete with an understanding of the context. I don't believe for a second Oldster works in generalisations.

    -------------------------------

    I think on a forum like this we have to be more general in our discourse. Off the forum there is an opportunity to hammer out detail and understand context better. This is also known as "coaching", and there we can move from theory and philosophy to actual practice and individualized training programs, etc.

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  • oldster User since:
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    Oldster said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Andrew Cojones
    "I think this was a fair post, so I will accept the correction Cummings. Consistency is something different than the pressure on young runners to run no matter what (otherwise you are a "cop out" or "someone who doesn't love the sport", etc.).

    From what I hear, Matt is generally a stand up guy so I don't think he intended this. But I do think people need to be careful with their wording here. Are we motivating or intimidating?

    Regarding Oldster, I do sense a tone of arrogance (or grouchiness, if you prefer). And I wonder, would his advice be as revered on the boards if not for:
    1) Canada's low population density?
    2) The fact that running isn't a major sport in Canada?
    3) The fact that motivated athletes generally find avenues and facilities to succeed (university sport being one of them)?

    Should we listen to someone who spits out cliches like "just get out the door". Then, when challenged - anonymously, or otherwise, turns into Oscar the Grouch, asks you to email him privately, says "this is all the advice you will get for free", rounds up his buddies, and generally bullies people on the boards. Pretty much does everything but get up in your face like a 140lb tough guy... And then wonders why people post anon?? Don't feed us this b.s.! It's this jerk-*ss mentality that turns people off competitive running!"


    Reverence? I get far more flak from anonymous-- yet also, perversely, attention-seeking--cowards like you than I get "reverence" (which I've never for a second expected in any case) from anyone else. I've spent an inordinate amount of my life doing and thinking about this sport. If I don't have useful experience to share about it, then who does? And, again, I never said anything about the level of performance I achieved. This has no bearing on the advice that I or anyone else who has spent as much time as I have up to his eyeballs in the sport might have to offer. And if there is one thing I happen to be an expert on it is simply how to keep going in the sport through thick and thin. And this has nothing to do with being Canadian, the relative popularity of the sport in Canada, or Canada's population density. I have devoted a lot of my energy to this sport by ANY measure. And, yes, just getting out the door is the single best piece of advice you can give to someone who says they want to run, has the time to run, but is finding it hard. Is this universal, applicable-to-everyone-in-any-situation, advice? Of course not. That's simply facile. But, for readers of a thread like this one, it's pretty useful general advice. Who's going to be "intimidated" by something so simple and straightforward?

    As for my tone, get over it. It's not the point, and it is reserved for anonymous contributors like you anyway. You want it to change? Be an adult and register an account. Pretend it's Facebook.

    This post was edited by Oldster 2 years ago . 
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  • new-post-last-visitcummings User since:
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    Cummings said 2 years ago

    Quoting: Andrew Cojones
    But I do think people need to be careful with their wording here. Are we motivating or intimidating?



    Fair enough. I can't say I disagree with you.

    I am going to stay out of commenting on anyone's personal character on this thread however. Wasn't the purpose of why I commented on the discussion to begin with. I am not sure about previous threads but I definitely didn't get any condescending tones from anyone in this current line of communication.

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